Mounting Lenses

whitetailfan

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I am aware of the fact that 49mm "Skylight 1A Filter" glass is the best for the shutter window but does anyone have any suggestions on what kind of glass I need to use for the flash and counter windows. This is my first attempt at this so everyone's input would be greatly appreciated. Also, how should I mount the filter glass?? Do I remove the metal rim around and mount it flush or do I mount them on the outside of the box?? Sorry the questions seem so dumb but as I stated, this is my first attempt.
 

coyotebandit

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I just use thin plexiglass for the flash and other "windows". I leave the glass in the metal ring, and cut the hole just large enough to fit the threads into. I also mount the glass on the inside, but it really doesn't matter. If you use plexiglass you can use hot glue, if you use glass, you'll need something better. Just make sure you seal everything up really good. Hope this helps.
 

bat

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I use UV's on the shutter (lens), and regular glass or welders clear lens on the others..I drill holes with a hole saw for each, except the sensor (use drill bit for it).  I glue the UV on the outside with the ring attached.  All other glass goes inside except the counter, I put it on the outside.  2¢  Tip:  be careful using the 49mm it gets awful close to the Flash hole.  Make sure you position it right to give your self room to isolate the flash hole.  :sun-shining:
 

BigPete

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Everyone here knows more than I do - so consider that when you read the following:  I grabbed an old picture frame and my glass cutter and cut the glass up into the "right sized" squares then RTV'ed them to the inside of the box.  Just developed my first role of film today and the pics are crystal clear.  Best of all, can't get any cheaper than free.  I noticed that discount stores sell 8x10" frames w/glass for about $2 - make a lot of boxes with one frame.
 

ArkansasElkHunter

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Bigpete,

Your catching on fast.  I use window glass on all my windows, shutter and flash.  Ive found that if youe camera is pressed up against the glass with a little pressure from the foam there is no need for anything to isolate the flash either.   I couldn't ask for clearer pics.  Bought some filters from bat to try, but havn't yet.  Most hardware stores have cutoffs they will give you for nothing.  Save that $2 for another Owl.
 

imadeerhntr

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I get mine at Dollar General store, they have a picture frame that has 6 2and half by 2and a half inch for 2 dollars, get great pics.                                                                                                                                                     Allen
 

Archilochus

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Glass is certainly the best for the shutter - photo filters are even better.  But I tend to drag my cams all over the place and treat them pretty harsh.  Therefore I use high quality Plexi-glas for the shutter and other 'windows' - I'd rather have a scratch than a busted 'window' (and have to drag the cam back home for repair.
If you check the cam pics on my site:
http://www.geocities.com/archilochus57
you'll see that using plexi also allows me to bolt the 'windows' on - makes for a VERY sturdy assembly.

$0.02

Archilochus
 

JoelM

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I use clear plastic for the flash and the lense. I have a bunch of CD cases laying around.
I just cut them to fit and hot glue them in place. My pictures are clear, and if they get to scratched up I just cut a new one from the CD cases.

Yes I even squeak when I walk : )   Have fun and use what works for you!!
 

MBullism

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Anyone above ever had trouble with the hot glue in the cold?  I haven't used it cause I thought I read here where it wouldn't hold well in the cold, but it sure would be easier....
 

coyotebandit

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I always use hot glue, I always make sure it's really hot, then it kinda melts right into the plastic. I have not used any real "glass" yet though. Sometimes you need to scuff up the surface first, but I haven't had any of my hot glue joints fail yet, and I had my camera out when it was -20 this winter. I even use the hot glue to bond the adjustable bungee ends to the enclosure, and they even hold up under tension. I have heard that other people have had problems, but it seems to work fine for me.
 

bat

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I had a few come loose at first then I noticed I had "Multitemp" glue sticks in my Mini Hi-temp gun.  I switched to Mini "High-temp" glue sticks and they do the job better.
 

ArkansasElkHunter

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Hot glue is like silicon glue.  There are a bunch of types besides the generic "hobby" type.  I don't know that much about it, but I do know there are several veriations available.  3M probably has somr info, might be something better out there.  

CB is yours anything special or just generic?  I tested some of my joints in the freezer.  I could "pop off" some of them pretty easy.  I did no surface prep though and I havn't tried it yet.  I will because you are right, its too easy to apply and I already use it for strain relief on my boards.
 

coyotebandit

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ArkansasElkHunter,
I use a cordless Themogrip brand glue gun. I used to use only the "good" glue sticks made for my gun, but I have switched to the all-purpose high-temp glue sticks, and they seem to be working fine. I think the key is to have the surface prepped, and get the glue as hot as you can. Sometime I will push the tip of the glue gun until it melts into the surface I'm trying to adhere to. This method seems to make the strongest bond I've found. It seems to melt the hot glue and plastic together at the joint, making it less likely to peel off the surface. Of course in extreme cold the glue will be more likely to crack, or separate, but I haven't had it happen yet. If you put it on too fast, not enough, or if it's too cold, the joint will be weaker than it could be. I'm not saying it's the best thing to use, I use it because it's quick, it doesn't stink, and it seems to work just fine for me.

From my experience, high-temp hot glue works best when bonding plastic to plastic, if you are using other materials, it might not work as well, especially in cold weather.

CB





(Edited by coyotebandit at 9:28 am on April 30, 2002)
 

ArkansasElkHunter

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Sure enough, 3M recommends two types of hot melt for almost all of the plastic resins we will encounter.  #3796 and 3764 for ABS, Polyethylene, Polepropylene and Poly carb.  The suggent isopropal alchohol as a prep along with light sanding for most plastics.  For Propylene(pelican Box) and ethylene they recommend lightly waving a blue(oxidizing) flame from a bunsen burner type torch to heat the surface untill it becomes "shiney".  a heat gun will also work.  I don't know if these glues come in stick form or not but the torch trick should help almost any type of glue to stick better.

somebody give it a try and let us know
 

MBullism

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I do use hot glue for alot of other cam related things, mostly on the wires etc.  may have to try it on a test enclosure first, I'm using modified ammo cans and glass/metal rimmed filters...  I can say this:  I bought some two part, two ton "super heavy duty gonna glue it for life" epoxy to secure the female half of my phone style disconnect to the inside of my enclosures, and it lasted about a week.  Gonna try the hot glue there too...

M
 

jayber

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I was using hot glue for butt-jointing a piece of 1/4" thick plexiglass to the Lexan boxes for my camera shelf.  I glued the long edge and ran beads up each end, top and bottom.  Needless-to-say, I didn't take much in the way of shear force to break it loose, warm or cold ambients.  So, I switched to using small screws.......and silcone for most everything else (sealing holes/glass, attaching foam, etc.).  I use a type of model glue for fastening the MS20 housing to the bottom side of the shelf.
 

coyotebandit

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I had bought some of that two part epoxy made for plastic to bond the adjustable bungee cord ends to the sides of the pelican case. I waited 24 hours and tested them on a chair in my house, and it broke within 5 minutes. That's when I decided to start using hot glue, and I haven't had one come off yet. If you don't prepare the surfaces correctly & get the glue and plastic warm, you will just end up with a weaker bond. The hot glue joints don't stand up to well to high impact blows, but I usually try to keep the high impact blows away from my camera also. For most applications during game cam assembly, assuming you follow the glue recommendations, it works just fine from my experience.
 


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