n00b Question : Anybody in SoCal use Hunting Seats?

TheGDog

Well-known member
Hello Gentleman,

It's been explained to me (thank you BubbleHide) that apparently I'm not "sitting on areas" anywhere near what would be considered long enough.

To that end... I'm curious to ask if those among you who hunt SoCal (D11, D13, D15, etc.) use any kind of Hunting Seats? If so... which have you found works well and is not heavy?

I'm reluctant/skeptical to go this route, as I've learned to appreciate going in light. However... I wanted to test-the-waters and hear what the general consensus is regarding using a hunting seat... thinking that if I heard a compelling Yes Argument... I'd look into potentially acquiring one... as I know I cannot sit comfortably directly on the ground very well for any lengthy period of time. At least not without shifting around a heckuva lot.

I also figured you never know... someone might suggest an alternative to an actual chair that may prove not heavy at all to pack in? Like some particular kind of pad/cushion material they've found that works really good for this purpose perhaps?

Any real-world input is appreciated. Thank you for your time and sharing your experience.

-G
 

Rodburner

Well-known member
try looking into a back pack intendeed for turkey hunting they have a seating pad attached might work out for you and they should be going on sale now or real soon
 
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TheGDog

Well-known member
Thanks GLP. I was thinking of trying just a cushion at first. Being concerned about weight.

JustGuy I asked specifically related to SoCal since in other things I've had people explain to me how item X or Y actually isn't really useful/helpful here in SoCal because of one reason or another that I wouldn't have thought of being newer to this.
 

TheGDog

Well-known member
try looking into a back pack intendeed for turkey hunting they have a seating pad attached might work out for you and they should be going on sale now or real soon
I've seen a few of those. Do they have any attached to backpacks which are big enough to haul out a (boned out) deer in one trip?
 

JustGuy

Banned
I seem to recall reading that these stools are only rated to 200 Lbs. I'm currently at 215.
I actually the same and it holds me well. I can sit on it for 2 hours no problem.
also, one more advantage i forgot to mention, i use it as a tripod/support when taking long shots. Very stable and comfortable.
I used to use sitting pads and found then not comfortable to carry, to sit on and most important when you need to get up, you need to make much larger movement- reveal yourself, when from this seat you can get-up or slide down very slowly and much more discrete.

Oh, and now i remembered one more reason i stopped using pads, the ants and tiks, in 15 minutes they are all over you because you virtually sitting on the ground and much easier target then when you are on on stool.

BTW, it was just a friendly joke about nor-socal, hope you see it
 
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TheGDog

Well-known member
I actually the same and it holds me well. I can sit on it for 2 hours no problem.
also, one more advantage i forgot to mention, i use it as a tripod/support when taking long shots. Very stable and comfortable.
I used to use sitting pads and found then not comfortable to carry, to sit on and most important when you need to get up, you need to make much larger movement- reveal yourself, when from this seat you can get-up or slide down very slowly and much more discrete.

Oh, and now i remembered one more reason i stopped using pads, the ants and tiks, in 15 minutes they are all over you because you virtually sitting on the ground and much easier target then when you are on on stool.

BTW, it was just a friendly joke about nor-socal, hope you see it

Ahh... thanks for that insight about the Ants/Ticks!

RE: Gun Rest -- Hmmph... I would have though it wasn't tall enough to be useful as a gun rest... I'd have thought most brush would be tall enough to make it not useful for that. Good to know. I have a BOG Bipod Stick for that, adjusted height for kneeling shot on one knee. But I would not mind ditching it if it meant less weight to carry overall.

I thought you were probably just making a joke... but figured I'd offer the valid reasons why I bothered to ask the question. It's happened before where I've purchased products... only later-on to have people tell me that in SoCal you're really not going to have much use for them. Such as the Knight & Hale Pack-Rack device to mimic Antler rattling in fights.
 

Bankrunner

Well-known member
I wouldn't bother with a seat unless you can leave it there for a season long stand hunt. With that said a cushion is a must for me. You should be able to find a log or rocks to put it on. If it's wet or snowing put your cushion down and you can get off your feet and keep your ass dry. The one below is light and durable, it's so light it will flap around in the wind and alert animals if its just clipped to your pack, you have to tie or strap it down.
http://sophuntinggear.com/products/?route=product/product&path=24&product_id=345
 

JustGuy

Banned
RE: Gun Rest -- Hmmph... I would have though it wasn't tall enough to be useful as a gun rest... I'd have thought most brush would be tall enough to make it not useful for that. Good to know. I have a BOG Bipod Stick for that, adjusted height for kneeling shot on one knee. But I would not mind ditching it if it meant less weight to carry overall.
It is what i did, ditched my bipod. and it is tall enough in most situations if you seat or kneel besides it - it is a good gun rest. But if you sit on the pad(read on the ground) and grass is tall, you do not see much anyway so, you do not need a bipod since you do not see anything to shoot at :).
Also, i usually sit besides a tree, use it as a back rest, so, if i cannot use the seat as a support, i use the tree. But at least it is easy to get up from it, my knees are not hurting and i have much better view. But again, it is me, different folks for different strokes, right? LOL...

BTW, i bought it 4 years ago on sale for $5. Not a big deal. You can have both and see which one you like more. maybe you like both for different situations. if you did not like it you could throw it away as i'm sure you did to many useless things.
 
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QuackAssassin

Well-known member
All of my hunting in the local hills is with a bow, if I'm on my ass it's usually to glass for a little or when I'm back in the truck. The chaparral and terrain for the style of hunting I pursue doesn't allow seats. However, I'd say your best bet is something that overall keeps you concealed enough and is light. Try stepping outside of the box . It's a seat it doesn't need to be manufactured for hunting . Camo is great but there is definitely a lot of products out there that usually are better than what most of the hunting lines have. Typically by price too. Check out some backpacking chairs for example. This last year I shot a deer with with my bow dressed in bright orange nikes, red and blue striped socks, gym shorts, green shirt, and a SF Giants hat. I just got off work that morning and forgot my shit. I'm a believer that yes concealment is helps , but I've capitilized a hell of a lot without the name brand gear. Or better yet a peace of equipment for a totally different purpose just cuzz it works better sometimes.
 

JustGuy

Banned
This last year I shot a deer with with my bow dressed in bright orange nikes, red and blue striped socks, gym shorts, green shirt, and a SF Giants hat. I just got off work that morning and forgot my shit. I'm a believer that yes concealment is helps , but I've capitilized a hell of a lot without the name brand gear. Or better yet a peace of equipment for a totally different purpose just cuzz it works better sometimes.
Sure, i told it many times on this forum, Camo is a big no-no in hunting especially for pig or deer. If they see one dressed in camo, they know straight away, :"Here is a hunter, he is after us, keep away"
but is they see one dressed in bright orange nikes, red and blue striped socks, gym shorts, green shirt, and a SF Giants hat they know, "oh, this is one hiker or tree huger, nothing to be afraid of"
:smiley-mouse::rotflmao:
 

TheGDog

Well-known member
This last year I shot a deer with with my bow dressed in bright orange nikes, red and blue striped socks, gym shorts, green shirt, and a SF Giants hat. I just got off work that morning and forgot my shit.
Hey QuackAssassin... roughly about how long would you say it took you practicing with bow before you felt you were good enough to even think about attempting to stick a deer with one? And I'm talking like from square one... as I literally just tried my hand at Archery last weekend for the 1st time in my whole life. (Simple Recurve 25 Lbs bow, on a campout with my sons Cub Scout pack at the OSO Lake campground) Seemed easy enough though. I was kinda diggin on it.

And another gentleman on here from Costa Mesa was tellin' me I totally need to get into the Archery side of things if I really want to have a good long hunting season here in SoCal. And it certainly would open up a whole lot of land for me.

Also... what's a realistic dollar figure to get myself all setup with a decent rig that I'd be happy with for a long time? I have an idea about how much *I* think it will be, but wanted to ask someone such as yourself whose gone thru it.
 

QuackAssassin

Well-known member
Honestly the first year I got my bow I went up to Oregon and stuck my first 3x3 on a buds property. I felt comfortable enough to shoot it by the time the season came .. But the hunting up there was out of a ground blind or tree stand. Here in SoCal u can get away with a stand or blind but it all depends on the geography and topography of the terrain your hunting in. I definitely would have passed my first season if it were in my local mountains here in the San Gabriels. An example would have been this last year when I made a 62 yard shot across a drainage. Now for some a 60-80 yard shot is nothing cuzz that's what (if able to) have the ability to practice on. It's still very challenging for me now. A lot of patience and kno about has been my greatest learning experience, as well as discipline to take the shot after hiking through hills.

I'm not very knowledgable about recurves as I am with a compound. My first rig I spend probably around 600 or the basic gear which included hot weather gear, decent arrows, ect. U can buy a pretty decent bow to start out with RTS or "ready to shoot" at basically any archery dealer. I upgraded to a larger peep site and a spot hog pin almost emediatley. Later upgrading to a hoyt vector turbo. If it's something you want to get into I highly suggest it. Archery is a completely different and rewarding dynamic of hunting which I've come to be very passionate about. I've taken a handful of game with my bow and have yet to take any with my rifles just due to it. I will say though if u start it become proficient with it and continue to gain as much discipline with your shot capability. In my opinion just like many others its the hunter that refrains from taking an unsure shot that retains a true ability to pursue his or hers game with due regard. Archery is just one of those things that'll really make u a better hunter both mentally and physically diciplined. I love it ! Hopefully the passion drives you as much as it does us all.
 

TheGDog

Well-known member
Sorry... I must not have expressed myself clearly... I definitely would be doing a compound bow for hunting.

So in our chaparral... I suppose it just means a person has to learn like hell how to crawl thru the brush quietly on all fours and sneak-up like a Ninja on 'em as best as you can to turn that 62 yards into as closer a distance as possible, eh?

Geez man... I would think the biggest reason to be darn sure about your shot would be the fact that if you miss you gotta go hike your butt over there and look for and fetch that damn arrow. From what I gather the cost of them adds up quick if you mess around and lose them.

Anyhoo... thanks for weighing in man.
 

Rtcc

Active member
I have been using the nifftseat for years. It brakes down small and is pretty light. It's best if you can lean against something but I use it alone. It's pretty good for a hike in seat, the 3 legged stools crush my nuts too much.

http://www.nifftseat.com
 

QuackAssassin

Well-known member
Good luck finding that arrow ! And carbon shafts like to splinter if they've been fractured, make sure u put the bend test on me befor shooting it again. Yes spot and stalk is a widely used method and it's a fun part of it. I've gone as far as taking the boots off and creepin it in the socks to get the right shot off.
 

jls456

Well-known member
I've hunted in D11 and D13 most of my life. Mostly D11, since around 1962. Got my first Buck in Frazier Park. My Grandpa parked me against a Pine tree and told me not to move until he and my Dad returned. I just sat on my butt,leaning against that tree. Got my First buck,a 5x4 sitting there.

Patience.
 

JustGuy

Banned
With archery you do not save money on hunting shoots because it is almost always a lost or broken arrow when you shoot an animal (approximately $10- $40 in my case), but you save huge on practice shooting, one arrow lasts long time if you shoot over 30 yards. Less than 30 yards if you practice often, very soon you will start splitting them. You can retrieve and reuse arrow, but you cant a bullet, powder and a primer.
 


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