OK, School me on the proper use of dielectric grease...

BelchFire

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I have a 2009 Silverado with 145,000 miles. The window switches (in all these models) are bad to quit working. The fix is to take the switch apart and use a pencil eraser to clean the small gold contact on the silicon overlay and re-assemble it. I have done this many times, and I'm getting tired of it. At first, it was every year, then every six months, now it's every month. For those of you who haven't ever taken one apart, the window contacts are on the circuit board and the silicon overlay just presses the gold contact patch down over the top of the two leads on the board, like a solenoid switch.

Is dielectric grease conductive, or protective? What I mean is, if I clean the contact patch and then use a tiny spot of dielectric grease on the assembly, will it stop them from corroding and continue to work as designed, or will short the switch entirely?

Short question for a long issue; can I use dielectric grease on a switch?
 



THE ROMAN ARCHER

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Is that the same stuff they use in Motorcycle turn signal sockets to keep condensation from corroding or moisture from shorting them out yet it still conduits the electricity no problem.. tra
 

BelchFire

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Yeah, that's the stuff. Will it short the switch, or will it impede the circuit in any way? I just don't want to ruin a switch assembly if I can keep it running just by cleaning it, but I'm tired of having to clean it over and over and over...
 

#1Predator

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Limited Out

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I use the stuff for all electrical vehicle connectors, I would try it on one switch. lite coat. Let us know how it works.
 

ltdann

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ltdann

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Had the same problem with my 2000 f150. Finally bought new switches from the switch doctor. took me all of 10 minutes to install, no problem since.
 

BelchFire

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Ya know; I hadn't even looked for a price, because I just assumed they'd be stupid. Hell boys; I could drop $15 on dielectric grease! I may just go for all new switches (driver's and passenger window and lock switches, rear doors windows and mirror controls). That is, assuming they're not corroded in the box. Thanks, ltdann!
 

P304X4

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The grease is to protect connections from air and humidity, there are also types made to coat dissimilar metals such as aluminium to copper in some house wiring to prevent oxidation. The best grease I ever found for vehicles was made by Bosch. The carbon buildup on the contacts is caused by arcing just before making a solid connection on the contacts. Some times it's just knowing the right grease to buy. If Switch Dr. isn't out of your price range it might be the better bet.
 

ltdann

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Glad to help. I used to pull the switches and rough up the contacts with an emery board. That would work for a month or so and then I I have problems again. I was like you and thought they'd be ridiculous expensive and then stumbled on switch doctor on Amazon.I took a chance and it turned out to be a good product.
 

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