One more tiger, a leopard, a civet cat

apittet

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Hello there!

Here we go for the second round of pictures directly from the woods of South India. Not great quality, but nice variety of animals with a close-up of a tusker, one more tiger, a leopard, a civet cat, a sloth bear and a dhole (wild dog). To give you a better sight at some of those animals I have zoomed in and cropped a few pics for details.

Have a look for yourself in Cam trap July 2002

Many pictures suffer from the short range of the flash, a good motivation to push ahead with mastering the slave flash.

Also, now that I feel a bit more relaxed amongst you guys, I will allow you all a good laugh by showing you the camera trap that we used to get these pics.

Click here to see our monster Jerry can camera trap

Ok, it’s really amazing that we got pictures from this, as any animal should have run away from such a contraption. You can also understand why I hesitated to show you this trail cam; after seeing the fantastic packaging and camo examples on this site I was really feeling odd to show this monster…But for us the plus points were:
  • quickly built (yes, we were very impatient, and also, here in India,  we do not get any of the superb cases you guys are using)
  • cheap, as the jerry can costs about 2.5 U$
  • does a decent job of protection against rain
  • no worry at all about flash bleed as there is no glass at all front of the camera
  • very simple to install: just put it down where you want and cover it up partly with twigs
  • low height suitable for small mammals
  • direct access to switches for both sensor and camera
The major minus point:
  • any one can easily walk away with it, as it even has a handle to carry.
Luckily these woods do not get too many visitors and the most likely offender would be the elephant. They are known to kick around what they do not like. We could already make out that they do not really enjoy the clicks and flashes, but luckily till now they did not decide to play football with our jerry can. Also, we make sure to cover it up with twigs that are not part of the diet of those animals.

In any case, after all what I saw on this site, we are now working on a decent box for our trail cam. By the way, what is the main motivation for all the camo work?
- So that animals don’t notice it?
- So that potential thieves don’t notice it?
- Because all your belongings have camo in any case?
- So that the wife does not see on what you spend your free time?

I am just curious as our animals don’t seem worried at all about the sight of it, but much more about this unexpected clicking sound and at night this disturbing flash.

All for now …

Cheers to all

Andre
 



shrtcirkt

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Great Pics apittet, thanks for sharing....
Over here most of us worry about making a camera that is "Bear" proof, making one Elephant proof would be a real challenge.
As far the reasons for camo... YES on all your points LOL.... except the last one for me... Being single I dont have to worry about hiding from a "Better half"

With all the seriously dangerous game you have wandering around there, have you ever had a close call with any> Do you take any special precautions while out checking your camera?
 

Cabin Fever Bob

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Thanks for posting your pics apittet! Certainly liked seeing those critters of yours! It's not that often that I get any elephant or leopard pics with my cams....
 

Archilochus

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Hi Andre,
As they say in the Real Estate business - the 3 most important things are location, location, and location.  You've got all three!  With wildlife like that - who cares what the camera looks like! :))

The camo is mostly for protection from human predators.  Sort of looks good too....

Archilochus
 

Tinhorn

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Howdy

Thanx for posting those pix's, can't believe teh Leapard let you walk within 100' of him, must have had his eye on the Jerry Can wondering what the heck it was, silly humans  he he

I think u're right on with the reasons for the camo,  mostly it's to hide it from "The Enemy" so they won't be stolen.  We all hope to be hiding it from the animals but just about every pix has the animal looking right at the camera so I don't think that part is working out too well......

Tinhorn
 

Brotherwolf

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Wow!! great pictures!!! thanks so much for sharing them! Love the Lepopard pics!!!
Thanks again!!!
 

shadow

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I personally camo mine for looks as I don't have the human preditor where mine sits nor do I have the bears or the like to worry about.  I believe that encasing it in a case with a "glass" lens that is sealed will keep dust out of the camera as well as keep the noise down from the clicks so that the animals don't notice it as much...thus keeping minimal attention from being drawn to it and if it is camo than when they see the flash they have a "hard" time picking it out...they know the direction but it just makes it a bit harder to find...by both man and animal.  My opinion...I am new at this as well...but everyone here has been more than helpfull.  Good luck and GREAT PICS!!!
 

apittet

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Hello again,

Yes shrtcirkt, making a camera elephant proof will be a challenge, as even if we fix it on a tree, those guys are well equipped to knock it off with their trunk or tusks. But I guess that if it’s not in their way they should not really go for it, unless … some of these guys are a bit unpredictable. Let’s see what happens. I was told also that rubbing the box with elephant dung will keep them off; I may try that too.

As for precautions while in these woods, let’s first say that tigers, leopards and such animals are not known to go after humans, with a very few exceptions who turn “man eaters”. Those are usually old or wounded tigers that cannot anymore hunt for their food and go after the most ill-adapted animal in the wood: guys like you and me! The presence of such a man-eater is very rare and would quickly make noise in the local papers. On the other hand we have to be careful with elephants, mostly single males, and also wild boars (not yet seen on our pictures). For both, the rule is “give them space and respect”. We usually go out in the woods with a jeep to place and retrieve the cameras, but we also trek through when going for animal census. For sure, in such occasion, when you are just left with your two feet, you feel rather small when you see a big tusker ahead. You even have a tendency to shrink further so that he does not see you if possible… Now, to complete the picture of these trips in the woods, you should also add all wonderful birds that we don’t get with the camera trap.

Never yet had a close call with any of them myself, by my wife and daughter had when they were trekking for the tiger census. In such case you have to take cast of the pugmarks with plaster of Paris to help identify the individuals. They were a group of 5, all bent over the job of getting the best possible cast of a clear pugmark when a young tusker came out of the thick bush just about 15 feet away. No need to say, all ran away dropping all material, plaster, mug, chopper, camera, bags. Then one tribal who was part of the group stopped at about 60 feet and gave out a loud trumpeting, imitating the elephant. The young fellow was apparently rather puzzled and decided to go away, allowing the group to recover all material without damage.

As for the sighting of the leopard, Tinhorn is right, it is not common to have such a good and close watch at such animal. In fact, we saw it watching us from the top of a rock while we were on a mud road. That was at less than 100 feet. We just froze there and had a good look at her for more than 5 minutes before she decided to go down behind the rock. She reappeared twice within the next 2 minutes, just to watch what we were doing there. A few hours later only we came to that spot to place a camera behind that rock, expecting her to come back … and Bingo, she came to the rendez-vous!

André
 

jayber

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Nice pics Apittet.....enjoyed the Jerry can trap too.....very creative!  Is that a Premier camera that you use?  What model if I may ask?
 

h2obobh2o

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Apittet...

Excellent photo's, it's great to get to see some wildlife that we normally wouldn't see.  I haven't seen any tigers or elephant's come by my camera lately :) I like the Jerry cam, very innovative for what you have to work with out in the bush. Thanks again Andre'!!
 

gtk

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Apittet...  

Thanks for sharing.  It's amazing to me how well that leapord blends in with his surroundings !    I also cant imagine that rabbit would be able to survive over there.  Between the tiger's, leapords, wild dogs, and bears eating him, he would have to worry about being trampled by an elephant (tusker as you call them)

Thanks again, and keep the pics coming.  
 

LW

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Great pics Andre, We have a predator much like your "dhole" here in Arkansas except they walk upright and look very much like humans, they cruze the woods when they think no one is watching, their diet consists of feeders, deer stands and trail cams we call 'em "aholes"   I camo to blend in so they don't devour my cams. I have often thought of smearing mine with elephant dung too, what's the postage on a 10 pound box of it from India to Arkansas!!?:rolleyes-green:

(Edited by LW at 1:28 pm on July 31, 2002)
 

TNDEERHUNTER

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Too cool apittet. Thanks for opening our minds to a new world. Those are some great pictures I look forward to seeing more. Thanks and take care over there.
 

quackmaster

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Awe guys whats all the fuss about, we've got all those critters here in Arkansas too! I wonder if the zoo will mind if I mount a cam in the tiger pit.  I thought you guys having to fend off bears had a little bit of danger to deal with when hanging your cams. I don't guess any of us have to really worried about getting stomped by an angry peanut eater or ate up by a hungry kitty cat.
 

Arrowhead

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Andre >> Those pictures are great. WOW.

Do you have to carry a gun when you set out your camera.

Your "Jerry" can is a first rate home brew. That's what it's all about. Making do with what you got.

Excellent work. Thanks for sharing.
 

apittet

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Yes Jayber, it's a Premier camera model BF 671D. It unfortunately needs a refresh pulse as it jolly well goes to sleep. Main plus point is its price (around the equivalent of 30 US$) and easy mod as there is enough space for wiring it comfortably.

For gtk about "tuskers": we tend to call the male elephants with tusks "tuskers". Unlike the african elephants, in the Indian variety only males have tusks. By the way this is a serious problem as the male population gets decimated by poachers for ivory. As a result, we have a big disymetry between female and male population. Poor guys have to look after too many ladies...

To quackmaster: you may ship some elephant dung from the zoo to "lw" as I think he would like to try some sample to smear the "aholes" in his area  !

Arrowhead, we normally dont carry anything but cameras. As mentioned in my earlier mail, hunting is illegal since years through out India; hardly anyone has guns and I do not even know if we could get a gun license. But the few times that I went in the woods with the officers from the forest department, they wanted to make sure that we are safe and took a gun along. I never saw them take any amunition by the way and I have always been wandering if the gun would really work in case of need ... some people take crackers as lighting them may make enough noise to scare away an agressive elephant. But till now I never needed to worry about this. Frankly I feel much more at risk in the wild city traffic ...

Cheers
Andre
 

jayber

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apittet,

Can you get your hands on the Premier BF-500D?  I was trying to get one sometime back.  However, my source overseas never got back to me.  Anyway, I recall seeing that camera being used in a commercial unit and was going to try and modify one and see how it compared to the Canon Owl PF Date.  I'd be interested to know how much they'd go for over there if available.  Take care!

jayber
>>------->
 

MCinIL

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Apittet, great pics as always. Thanks a bunch for sharing your world with us. MC.
 

arlow

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apittet,

     It is great to see your pics from across the oceans.  When you go walking in the woods do you wear those masks on the backs of your head so the kittys don't think they are sneaking up behind you?:skeered:  
 


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