Paradise ducks, Peacocks, Peahens, Pukekos, Possums, Pro-from-Dover, Pigs, and Piss me off fishing.

asaxon

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Messages
1,076
Reaction score
8
“P”s in New Zealand: Paradise ducks, Peacocks, Peahens, Pukekos, Possums, Pro-from-Dover, Pigs, and Piss me off fishing.

The Admiral and I were in New Zealand for a family wedding. Afterward, we headed to Rotorua, near from whence the Admiral hails. Figured to do a bit of fishing and hunting with RD who lives there.

The first day we went to a local lake to jig for trout with flies and to have a swim in the volcanic hot pools at the lake’s edge. After trying a few spots, RD’s line gets tapped and right after that, the Admiral’s line goes taut. The fish takes out line and shakes it’s head like a yellowtail. RD says, “that’s a good fish - the smaller ones come up and jump while the bigger ones hunker down.” Sure enough, 5 minutes later the Admiral boats a gorgeous 10 lb. rainbow (photo 1). RD tries to take credit by claiming he pulled his line out of the way so it would go to the Admiral’s. Right! After the appropriate celebration and a soak in the hot pools, I manage to land a 3 lb rainbow. A great day except when we get back to the house, the Admiral proceeds to put my fish into the mouth of her fish (photo 2) – Piss me off!

We then get a couple days of heavy rain after which RD and I decide to try to stalk peafowl aka Peacocks and Peahens while the Admiral is off doing some genealogy research and visiting the “cuzzy bros”. Peafowl are an invasive species in NZ so open season all year and no license required. Simply put, stalking peacocks is like stalking wild Tom turkeys. They hang around in “mobs”, (NZ for flocks) so there are always eyes looking everywhere. They spot you from half a mile and then run away. On top of that, there is a very large grass feeding NZ field duck, the Paradise duck, (photo 3) which are incredibly vigilant. These buggers see you from a mile away, send out alarm calls to everything in the area and remained focused on you and alarming until you are out of sight. Thus hunter’s nickname for them of “Bloody Parries”.
The wind is blowing quite hard on the back end of the storm but what the heck. We go out to some lovely farmland with stands of bush and trees between incredibly green pastures. We are armed with a 17 HMR with a silencer and a 3x9 scope and a 12 gauge shotgun. Shoot them at up to 120 yards with the 17 HMR (photo 4)and if we flush one, use the shotgun. The first thing we see and visa-versa is a pair of “Bloody Parries. Alarm and finally 20 min later, we get away from them.

After hiking all about and having several more encounters with “bloody parries”, RD peeks around a hillside and immediately jumps back – “Andy, there is a hen bird just round the corner some 30 yards up the hillside and there should be others with her.” So I go back and cut over the ridge to where the bird should be. I carefully peak over the edge and what do I see, two large purple birds – Pukekos (photo 5), aka NZ Swamp Hens.
I am very puzzled. RD is a top gun bird hunter. He saw a Pukeko? They don’t even come close to a peafowl. As I stare, I see two gorgeous mature peacocks come running out from under the hill, no more than 40 yards away. I put the scope on them and watch them scamper away followed by some hens and juvenile males. Why did I let them run away? I got “Cock Fever!” I FORGOT that RD said to shoot them in the body so I am busy trying to aim at their tiny bobbing heads (as if I had a shotgun with turkeys at home) and could see I would never make that head shot. Dummy! Apparently, RD had just glimpsed the peahen and had not seen the Pukekos or he would have mentioned them. The whole thing is what they call in NZ a “Cock Up” so I did not get a peacock down.

After that, we had several more sightings of various peafowl but in spite of our long circuits to try to sneak up on them, the birds always had seen us and were gone when we got to where it would be close enough to shoot. Finally, we get to about 130 yards from a pair of nice peacocks standing by a fence line but there is no way to close the distance – the country is all open. So I decide to try the shot – unfortunately, the wind is blowing a gale. Not only was the tiny 17HMR bullet going to drop at the distance but more importantly, the wind was probably going to push it 8 inches or more in some unknown direction. I put the cross hairs on the chest of a gorgeous peacock and pull the trigger; “crack” (17 HMR with silencer). The cock fluffs his feathers, looks around puzzled and walks about a bit. I send two more rounds downrange, now aiming a bit higher and “upwind”, but same thing happens. Then the two cocks simply disappear over the hill. (photo 6) As the day is getting late, we walk between to fences that are 12 feet apart along a ridge top only to see a cock and hen in front of us. But of course they have seen us. RD hands me the shotgun and says “run at them, they may have trouble taking off because they are so close to the fences.” I do my imitation of running and see the cock fly off. We walk along some more and lo and behold, we find the hen bird trapped in a narrow gap between the fence and an open gate. As I go to close the gate to let her out, she bares a set of wicked looking fangs and flies right at me in attack mode I had to shot in self-defense (photo7) and still she managed to scratch my arm before dying. WTF! Only then does RD lets me in on a very well-kept secret – these are vampire peafowl. There is a NZ government conspiracy to keep these dangerous critters a secret for if the truth ever got out, it would kill the Tourist industry that keeps NZ the economy humming. That is my story and I am sticking to it! And if you read to the end of part 2, you will see the proof.

001 (1280x960).jpg002 (892x1280).jpg003 (960x1280).jpg004 (640x456).jpg005 (480x618).jpg006 (1280x960).jpg007 (1280x959).jpg
Continued on Part 2
 

asaxon

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Messages
1,076
Reaction score
8
PART 2

PART 2

The next evening, we go out Bushy-tailed Possum hunting. This is done at night with a spotlight off the back of a pickup truck (photo 1) – The Admiral calls this “terminating environmental terrorists with extreme prejudice.” It is her favorite hunting; aim between the red eyes and hear them plop to the ground. We use the 17 HMR with that wicked silencer. The silencer is so as to not disturb the farmers.

These “cute” critters are a huge invasive pest problem in NZ with adults weighing up to 30 lbs. They are native to Australia. They eat everything, native insects, plants, bird’s eggs, small birds etc. And there are 30 million or so munching their way across the country. Over the course of the evening, we terminate 8 of these buggers (photo 2), a drop in the bucket but good fun after which RD and I have our dead possum chucking contest. He wins (again) – my excuse is I get no practice back in the States.
On our last morning in NZ, we head out to the stream the runs through the Admiral’s home village for a spot of fly-fishing with RD. He is the “Pro from Dover” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KojghwX_9eM) at fly fishing this stream After RD and the Admiral catch a 2 lb. rainbow and begin to work their way upstream; I lay down in the trees nearby when I hear a wild Pig grunting. I get to my feet as the sound gets louder and louder. Suddenly the ugliest boar I’ve ever seen is coming right at me. He has 4 inch tusks and he looks like he means business. I am unarmed but for a fly rod but I decide to man up and “Stand my ground” rather than ignominiously try to climb a tree.

This viscous looking brute comes on and on and as he gets close, I see a strange look in his eyes. Maybe he hates Yanks. I figure I am in for it now…. (photo 3). Then when this monster is about 2 feet away from me, he stops, looks up at me lovingly, grunts and turns sideways. After I give him a good scratch behind his ears, he simply lies down and goes to sleep under some ferns (photo 4). It is a native Kunikuni pig. They are “stock” animals for some of the locals who let them roam about in the forest. They have straight tails, funny “jowls” and the boars developed incredibly ugly faces when mature. No brands or ear-tags necessary, everyone knows whose pig is whose. How do you forget a face like this?

Then I hear a shout from the stream so I rush over to the bank. There is the Admiral hooked into a big Brown trout that is thrashing about and pulling her down river. After lots of excitement, advise; “keep you rod tip up, pull left, walk down stream with him etc.” and with even some coaching from a Kunikuni sow who has wandered by (photo 5), a gorgeous 8.5 lb Brown trout is in the net. Wahoo!

What a thrill. After the photos, the fish was carefully released back in the stream (photo 6 & 7). The only trouble was that fish was far bigger than any trout I have ever caught in a stream – Piss me off again.
Well we thought our NZ adventure was over. However, the day after we get home, I wake up in morning with a craving for blood. I could not understand what was happening but then I remembered that scratch from the peahen in NZ. I look in the mirror and I don’t see myself so I take a selfie and check. I have a peahen’s head crest on my nose (photo 8). That and having no reflection in a mirror can only mean one thing. OMG, I am turning into a vampire peafowl – Oh Nooooooo……………….



No Animals Were Harmed Unnecessarily In The Telling Of This Tale But I Can’t Say The Same About The Truth


008 (1280x960).jpg009 (960x1280).jpg010 (960x1280).jpg011 (1280x960).jpg012 (1280x960).jpg013 (1024x1020).jpg014 (1024x768).jpg015 (1217x1280).jpg
 

scottmarine

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2012
Messages
519
Reaction score
1
Beautiful fish! Great story as always! Love reading your posts. Looks like you guys had an amazing adventure!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Bankrunner

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 19, 2012
Messages
1,779
Reaction score
11
Wow, what a great trip, sounds and looks like you took full advantage of the adventures at hand.
Don't we owe all our american brown trout to New Zealand?
So you had me thinking about planning a trip as New Zealand has bean on my bucket list for a long time. I say you had me thinking... until I saw the Vampire symbol, the blood looks dry but i can't tell for sure. It's below the cocks head on the fence in "photo 7".
That was great telling of your adventures!
 

ltdann

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
4,731
Reaction score
115
You're my hero, Andy. Nice pig you found, seen one like that in the backyard....maybe a cousin?
 

asaxon

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Messages
1,076
Reaction score
8
This is my 1000 post on JHO. I now turn into a pumpkin so I had better make it good and hope Jesse blesses me and lets me post in the future.…

Yes, Dan, Molly would likely fall in love with one of those Kunikuni Boars. There is quite a resemblance in body physique to that most fabulous Fallbrook pig. But I did not find that pig, he found me! As for being anyone’s hero, more likely just good at exaggerating.

No, Bankrunner, Brown trout and indeed all trout (Rainbow etc.) are not native to NZ. All trout were introduced to NZ but they have thrived in the conditions – same as the Red Deer. The Rainbows mature very quickly. That big Rainbow of the Admiral’s was probably only 4 years old. The Brown trout grow very slowly in comparison and the big one the Admiral released was more like 20 years old.

May all you JHO folks enjoy every day.
 

P304X4

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Aug 17, 2012
Messages
3,214
Reaction score
53
Great story as always and loved the pics.....girls still love the earrings.
 

dustin ray

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2009
Messages
1,998
Reaction score
23
Turn into a pumpkin thats going to hurt ...and yes my daughter still has a pair of earrings thank again
 


Top Bottom