Pic. Delays

Munce27520

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What have you experienced camers found to be the best delay value for your cams when posted on a bait station? I'm trying to determine what the best parameter would be to use without nearing a potential 3 minute shutdown on an OWL shutter press. Thanks.
 

Munce27520

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Come on folks post a reply, this has been viewed 9 times and no one has any input? I find that hard to believe. Please help me out.
 

coyotebandit

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My friend uses a 10 minute delay on his camera over bait. I set mine up with a 30 sec delay over corn, and besides the pesky squirrels it was just fine. I would think if you have a maximum of 3 minutes, you would want the longest delay possible. Most critters tend to hang out awhile at bait piles. But that's just my opinion.
 

Munce27520

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Thanks Bandit for the reply. With yours set at 30 sec., do you get many multiple pics of the same animal? Your friends 10 min. seems to be so long, does he think he is missing any shots?
 

coyotebandit

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Some turkeys came in, I got 3 or 4 pics of them, so they must have stayed for only a few minutes. I got a couple pics of coons, two different nights, I think the flash might have scared them away. Then the squirrels used up the rest of my film.
My friend sets his to 10 minutes and puts in a roll of 36 exp, because he doesn't get up to his land very often. I'm sure he misses some, but most come back for a 2nd pic. I don't think there is a perfect setting where you won't get too many pics of one animal, and never miss another.
 

GeorgiaHunter

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I started with a 2 minute delay and found that because there were so many does and coons, and the length of time each group stayed on the corn my roll was used up before I could get a shot of a buck. usually in the first day (one roll was nothing but coons).

The goal for me was to shoot all of the pics within a 1 week timeframe without shooting all the pics in the first day or two, or even of a single feeding event.

I added an event counter to my setup so I would know how many total triggers I had for the week and using this information along with watching deer come into feed on corn at home I decided that I could use a 20-30 minute delay in order to get 1 or 2 shots of each feeding event. this would allow me to get a complete sample of what was coming in to feed.

Keep in mind that it may take the deer (especially the buck) a couple of weeks to find the feed if you do not place it on a regularly travelled route. Once they all know where the corn is it will be eaten within a weeks time.

Seemed to work for me. Hope this helps
 

Brian

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I put out a digital camera over a mineral lick last spring and put it on a 15 second delay.  I don't think I ever checked the camera that there were less than 100 pictures.  It looked like a short movie of what was going on.  I would get pictures of the same deer with its head down and then up and then down and then up until it moved and then so forth and so on.  I thought it was pretty neat.  I had one doe stay right by the camera and everytime she moved her head it would take a picture but since it was daylight she never new her picture was being taken.  Pretty neat stuff.

I have found that the best time excluding the rut period over bait only is about 10 to 15 minutes.  Most does will hand out for quite a while eating corn and the coons will literally take up a whole roll.  There is kind of a trade off between how often you check the camera and how long between pictures.  Undoubtly, you may miss a deer if you have to long a delay but when the rut is not on the bucks coming in have groceries on their mind and are very likely to be there long enough for a picture or two.  I would lower the delay between pictures during the rut.
Digitals were made for scrapes and bait piles.  They solve all the delay time issues.  Set them up as fast as they can go and make sure there is enough memory and battery power and your set.
 

TNDEERHUNTER

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I use a 3 min delay over feeders and food plots. It seems to work well.It really depends on what your wanting.LOL
 

LW

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I use a 10 min delay, I get a 24 roll every 3 or 4 days, I had about 200 pics last fall and only 5 or 6 were daytime, in January I shut the afternoon feeding off and doubled the morning feed so the squrrels,rabbits and rats would not get  all the corn. My next roll had 22 of 28 daytime pics.  Learned a little lesson.....
 

Munce27520

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Thanks guys, you all make some very good and different points that I need to consider. I was debating whether or not to add a timer circuit to my first cam. I was interested in the post that Tinhorn brought up about the RS/PIR and getting a 2.5 - 3 minute delay from the sensor.
Actually, I like Brian's point about digital cameras for the scrapes and bait stations. Maybe I will tinker with 2 analog cameras and then move into the digital enviroment.
 
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