Plated Brass?

mstan99999

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Is there any reason I shouldn't reload nickel plated brass?
I have a coffee can full of 357 mag brass, but it's all nickel plated.
Thanks!!!
Matt
 

Mntngoat

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It is harder than standard brass does not have the springback that brass does and can scratch your dies.

ML
 

BelchFire

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Nickel is a VERY hard metal. It is still a brass case as you noted, but as Mntngoat stated, it can scratch your dies. That having been said, I've loaded a boatload of nickel plated .357 with carbide dies. Not problemo if you use carbide. In fact it's a MUCH prettier load when it's all said and done.
 

myfriendis410

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Electro-plated nickel is NOT harder than hardened steel. Most nickel brass is a thin electroplate, about .00015" (1 1/2 ten thousandths max.) The substrate it's plated to will dictate overall handling. I've found nickel brass is actually easier to work with due to it's natural lubricity. You can try it for yourself by running brass and nickel brass through your sizer with your eyes closed. You can certainly tell them apart, 'cause the nickel is way easier.

Electroless nickel, a different process, is very hard when it is applied properly and austenitized at around 650 C. You must remove the hydrogen from the plating by heating in a furnace, which will drive it out and bond it intimately to the substrate metal. It is a fantastic finish for firearms, when done correctly.
 

huntducks

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Electro-plated nickel is NOT harder than hardened steel. Most nickel brass is a thin electroplate, about .00015" (1 1/2 ten thousandths max.) The substrate it's plated to will dictate overall handling. I've found nickel brass is actually easier to work with due to it's natural lubricity. You can try it for yourself by running brass and nickel brass through your sizer with your eyes closed. You can certainly tell them apart, 'cause the nickel is way easier.

Electroless nickel, a different process, is very hard when it is applied properly and austenitized at around 650 C. You must remove the hydrogen from the plating by heating in a furnace, which will drive it out and bond it intimately to the substrate metal. It is a fantastic finish for firearms, when done correctly.
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AGREE AGREE & AGREE, I really like NP brass in rifle loads and it does not scratch your dies.

Pistol I just mix it all together.
 

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