Please help!!!

Good Ole Boy

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Well, I am finally trying to complete my first camera and having one hell of a time soldering. Yes this is my first time at soldering, but I am trying anyway. I have read to heat up the wire then push it into the solder, but the wire never seems to heat up enough to do anything more than dent the solder bubble. Also I have heard to apply a small amount of solder to the tip of the iron before soldering, but everytime I try this the solder just melts and falls into my case. Can anyone help me out here. I am discusted.
 



TNDEERHUNTER

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HI Good Ole Boy, Sorry to hear you are having trouble. What type of soldering iron do you have? What kind of solder? Is your soldering iron adjustable(The heat)? I always tin the wires before I solder them. This makes it a little easier.

(Edited by TNDEERHUNTER at 9:15 pm on July 12, 2002)
 

TNDEERHUNTER

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Is that rosin core solder? Try putting a little solder on the tip of the iron and then tin your wires. Then try to solder them. Also when you get done soldering clean the tip of the iron with a wet sponge or fine steel wool.LOL
 

davered1

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GOB,

do yourself a favour and pick up a tub of acid paste flux from your local hardware store. this tub cost me 1.69 and I have made a pile of cameras. Dip wire into it then touch it to hot solder iron and solder will literally RUN into entire piece of exposed wire.Rub it onto any part of the board you nedd it and the solder will run only on the green runs exposed, will never jump off track.


try it I guarantee you will be impressed

 

shrtcirkt

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GOB,
I have been soldering for awhile so let me try to explain afew points for you. Soldering is fairly simple but like most things you need to have the proper equipment, materials and above all else some practice. I am going to assume that you are trying to solder to something such as the terminals on a switch, so I will use this as an example.

There are several steps to follow, I suggest you practice them on non critical parts first.
Tools:
Soldering Iron
resin cored solder
A good resin flux, I prefer liquid, some prefer paste
a moist sponge or damp paper towel (for cleaning your iron tip)
a small pair of round nose or needle nosed pliers

Now the basics;
1) your parts need to be clean, a light brushing with alchohol will work for this.
2) your parts should be pretinned. To do this, you apply solder to each part to be joined, just enough to get a nice thin coat on terminals, and enough to "wick" into the strands of wire.
Pre-tinning steps,
1) wipe the tip of your iron on the moist sponge to remove any solder or flux residue. If a black crust remains on the tip and can not be removed discard and replace the tip, you;ll never get good heat transfer with a dirty solder tip. * I wipe my tip before every solder joint*
2) apply a small amout of solder to the tip of the iron, heat it up just enough for a small amount to transfer onto the tip.
3)place a drop or two of flux on the terminal then place the tip against the terminal to be tinned lightly, as the the heat from the tip transfers to the terminal place the end of a stand of solder against the terminal, as it heats the solder will melt and flow onto the terminal. This is called wicking. Remember just a small amount, enough to coat the terminal. Remember a light touch is all that is needed. A good rule is that the surface coats with solder without filling the hole in the terminal.
To tin wires you follow the same procedure except place your iron tip at the endof the wire, and place the solder end close to the end ofthe wire insulation on the bare strands. As the wire heats the solder will melt and flow towards the heated tip. Just enough solder to flow into the wire strands evenly. This wicking is caused by cappilary action. Remember to remove the solder before you get too much solder or it wicks under the insulation.
Joining the wire to the terminal;
1) use thepliars to form a small "J" at the end of the wire, loop the j through the hole in the terminal.
2) while heating the terminal with the tip of the soldering iron, apply solder to the area, just enough to "flow" into the wire and terminal,making a nice "fillet".

Sorry this was so long, but I hope it helps.
I have been soldering for over 20 years and take some of the steps for granted, and I may have left something out. Sorry if I did, but anyone else can point out what I missed.
 

shrtcirkt

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WOW, 4 replies in the time it took me to write all that!!
hey Dave.... you may want toget rid of that fllux!!!! Acid flux will corrode and eat up your connections.
*NOTE* all electrical soldering should be done with resin flux only.
Save the acid flux for old radiators and copper tubing.
 

gizz

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Hey Dave, good thing you have that warranty with your cams:jaw-drop:
 

Good Ole Boy

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Well, I think my problem may have been that the iron was too hot, and the trick with cleaning the tip helped a good bit as well. Thx to all.
 

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