Pointers or Flushers

Qbn Hunter

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It's been kinda boring on the board lately. So to make it alittle more interesting I am going to open a can of worms. So for upland game hunting do you guys like a flushing or pointing dog better?  
 

songdog

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After hunting with a pointing dog in ID this year I wish I had more of an excuse to get one... But for CA birds which pretty much means quail and ducks, it's harder to justify a pointer.  Still it might make me drive more to hunt for chukar and pheasant more often.

I'm trying to be talked into a pointer...
 

Qbn Hunter

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I am a big fan of Labs. The only thing is that it's too hot to hunt with one here in So. Cal. I only hunt upland game. If I go with a pointer I would have to go with a GSP.
 

Fubar

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I used to have a German Shorthair and it was a fantastic duck dog. When hunting upland birds they can go all day. Labs make a good family dog, especially if you have kids.                  Fubar
 

hronk

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I'll stick to my Lab and carry extra water....hronk
 

David

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I have had both, but with the terrain and heat my money goes to the pointers.  I presently have a Brittany and he can cover ground far quicker and longer than any of my labs.  Labs are great for duck huntin but a pointin dog is where its at for upland!
 

Whoadog

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n  We already had this debate a couple of months ago.  Pointing dog enthusiasts mwill never win a debate when labs are the second most popular dog in the world, doesn't mean they are better bird finders.  As I said when I hunt Quail Point I always hunt the fields that I have seen labs in prior.
 
Songdog,
  Once a covey of valley quail are flushed the singles hold excellent for pointing dogs and the shooting can be great.

Brian
 

Mojave

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I have hunted with my (late) Golden, "Pancake", my (lost) Brittany, "Norman", my friend's German Shorthairs, and various mutts. Hunting with a well-trained pointing dog is, to me, the ultimate in upland hunting. A good flushing and/or retreiving dog is next best, and any decent well-disciplined mutt can improve the hunt, compared to hunting without a dog (don't think I'd stoop to bringing along my daughter's toy poodle, though). Pointers do tend to be more hyper than flushing/retrieving breeds. Thats not necessarily a fault - just the nature of the beast.
 

birdogman

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It's kind of cool that we can sit here and talk about these important issues. Dogs are cool. They make the hunt so much more fun. My dog has really become a companion to me when I solo hunt. Labs are definately up there, but my 9 year old GSP just keeps getting better and hasn't slowed up a bit. She handles the heat, short hair means no burrs, and she can water retrieve, flush and point, and go straight up Red Mountain!! GSP's and Labs get my vote. I'm really getting interested in these pointing labs, I saw one work and it's amazing.
 

Bodie

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I currently have a one year old lab.  He did extremely well with hunting pheasants, quail, and chukar this year.  However, on warm days, on dry land he would over-heat after awhile.  Then I would have to rest him for 30-45 minutes until I could hunt him again.  If a water source was available for him to occasionally roll in it helped out.  From my experience, the lab seems like a great all around dog, just not the most ideal dog for each hunting situation (How does that saying go????Jack of all trades, but master of none???).

I really enjoy upland hunting, so I am contemplating two options.  Get another lab or get a pointer.  If I get another lab it would allow me to rotate my dogs throughout the day to provide rest and prevent the over-heating problem.  If I get a pointer it would probably make a great upland dog in those warm, dry conditions and have the ability to run hard all day, however, I worry about the wander-lust factor.  I lost a Beagle to this recently and it has been such a heart retching experience that I am somewhat afraid to get another dog that just wants to run out and hunt up all the land in sight with or without you.
Labs are so loyal, that they will not take off and leave you forcing you to go find them.  They might take off a little ways, but they always come back quickly.  I personally think that my lab loves his food so much that he would never leave me.

Anyways, another idea that has been rolling around my head for the past month is to suggest to Jesse to start a new forum section devoted to dog discussions.  I think a lot of us train dogs with limited knowledge gathered from books, friends, and hunting experiences and that by hearing other people speak about their experiences we could all benefit.  I think everyone out there has questions regarding things like: breed characteristics, training methods, problem solving, and available books and training devices.  Many of us have spent way too much money buying books or training supplies to only find out that another product was better then the one we purchased.


(Edited by Bodie at 3:12 pm on Dec. 14, 2001)
 

Fubar

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Bodie  You better watch out. Everyone who suggests that Jesse start another Forum usually ends up as the Forums Moderator.              Fubar
 

Bodie

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Fubar,

Thanks for the heads up!!!!!  Perhaps I should go back and edit my post???????

Have you ever heard the comment...Do eat to live or live to eat?  Well sometimes I feel like I live to be with my dogs.  I am very passionate about canine companionship.  I spend more time either with my dogs or thinking about them than anything else in my life, maybe even more then with my Fiance.  Luckily, she is in her senior year of Veterinary school and just as passionate about animals.
 

Whoadog

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Bodie,
 People way over hype the "runaway dog" as I said before it is all about socialization.  Although i lost my elder dog for a good spell this year at Gray Lodge pheasant hunting, but with his age and my experience with him I felt he got lost more than running away.  When we found him he was scared and very glad to see us.  I had Dan Viera with me from the forum and he was very thoughtful about me losing the dog and I think he was as relieved as I to find him.  I let my dogs run wherever thye want, as they know their job better than I, but they are hunting for me and not for themselves, a big difference.

brian
 

Qbn Hunter

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I'll second that. I wouldn't mind being the moderator if it isn't too hard.
 

Fubar

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Qbn Hunter  If I can do it anyone can do it. I think Jesse gladly accepts volunteers.            Fubar
 

Bodie

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Whoadog,

I see your point about proper socialization, however, have you ever been around a hound dog.  They are nose to the ground hunting and smelling everything in sight.

I feel that I went above and beyond what most people do as far as socialization and training.  As a pup that dog went everywhere with me, sometimes even if it was just a car ride to the store and back.  I even used to take her to the dog park in Davis in the evenings.  Sometimes there would be up to 50 dogs out there playing off leash.  Plus I had several animals at home for her to socialize with and she was the only one given the privilege of being able to sleep in our bed.  She was given lots of attention and lots of love.

I also, thoroughly trained her with the e-collar, using the "teach them to turn it off and complete avoidance tactics."  She was extremely well trained, however, if she could find an opportunity to escape or take off on you to get in more hunting time she would do it.  

Perhaps living out in the country, were there are jackrabbits everywhere made it more difficult.

Also, she got away from me or escaped several times in the four years I had her.  Each time I was always able to find her or she would eventually come home.  My gut feeling this time is that coyotes got her.  In the same week we lost her I heard coyotes close to my house in the middle of the night for the first time in the four years I have lived out here.  Coyotes seem like the most probable thing since she knew her way home and if she got way out there and someone picked her up everyone knew who she belonged to (I only have a few neighbors scattered throughout the farmland out here).

Well, I could go on and on talking about dogs.  Lets work on trying to get that forum set up.  Qbn Hunter, I would be willing to help you out if you want to be the moderator.  In fact, I think some of the forums have more than one moderator.  If that is that case I would be willing to share the workload with you and be a moderator too.
 

WingSetter

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I would rather hunt with flushing dogs anytime.  As they jump game up not point at it.  The element of suprise of flushing game is far more exciting and challenging than a dog that points game.  I have hunted with both types of dogs.  To me, the thought of a dog pointing something out for me to shoot is far less desireable than the element of suprise.  It just seems that you know the bird is there and you pretty much walk towards the bush with you safety off, and your gun half shouldered ready to shoot when the bird flushes.  Most of the enjoyment of the hunt is finding and flushing your own game.  In my opinion the lab is the best all around dog.  Not trying to start a war, or say that a pointing dog is not good just my  2-cents.  
 

Whoadog

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Bodie,
 I handled a termite detection Beagle for over two years so yes I am familiar.  This dog was with me all the time and of course this is not the normal and I have heard plenty of hound stories from experienced hounds people, many of which will turn your stomach.  If you want a pointing dog for hunting you don't go buy a field trial dog, you go buy from a hunting line.  True a field trialer will hunt but they are breed to run a mile before they even start using their nose.  Since we live so close to each other we should go out and hunt sometime together.

Brian
 

uhunter

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dog forum would be great, i believe just hunting with a dog is great fun. I have a golden retriever and he is great, loves to get ducks and does a good job flushing quail and finding down birds. Most importantly he is a great family dog, plays great with kids and actally gets along with the wife. He does get hot hunting here in so cal but i get him a hair cut in sept and it helps until it starts to get cooler. The only down fall is cleaning him up after and during the hunt getting all the burrs out of him. But he is my first golden and he is working at great he is four and gets better every year.
 

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