Prime Rib, got to be my favorite cut of meat

OPAH

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OK
the question is where is the Prime Rib cut on a Deer or Pig ?
 
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BelchFire

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Backstrap or loin is the prime rib. The "eye" of a T-bone is the loin muscle. True Prime Rib on a beef comes from a certain area (front to back) too, and I'm not good enough to tell you which end (I think front). A bonafide butcher would know.
 

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So for Deer and Pig it is the Back strap ?
 

Wild1

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No, it's cut differently and the taste and texture will be different. In other words, don't plan on getting "prime rib" from a hog. A beef prime rib is not the length of a venison backstrap (along both sides of the backbone), but rather cut usually cut from the 4th rib to the second to the last rib - at the backbone.
 

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OK no Venison or Pork Prime Rib, going out Friday and getting my Prime Rib on !
 

garlicsalt

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Ribeye is the best, good luck finding that on your pig............Hell good luck finding your pig!
 

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This week end my friend, the hunt is on
 

#1Predator

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There are two different naming systems allowed by the Bureau of Weights and Measures for restaurants versus supermarkets. It's confusing.

Starting from the shoulder of a steer, the first five ribs (including the shoulder blade) is the "chuck" (market name, "Chuck Roast" or "Chuck Steak" when cut to "steak" thickness , "Boneless Chuck Roast", "Rolled Shoulder Roast" (boneless chuck roast with netting)). The restaurant name is usually "Pot Roast", a generic name applied to any meat that is roasted in a pot (covered/with lid) in the oven. This is a tough piece of meat if "dry" cooked (BBQed, fried, etc.).

The next seven ribs are the "standing rib". There is a "large end" at the front (the end that was attached to the "chuck" before it was seperated) and a "small end" at the back, the part that was attached to the loin where the "T-bone", "Porterhouse" steaks come from, as well as the "New York" (bone-in version called a "Delmonico" steak by restaurants) and "Filet Mignon". A single rib is left attached to the loin at the "T-bone" end (where the standing rib was attached). FYI - Cattle have 13 ribs, pigs have 14 ribs.


Market name - "Standing Rib Roast"
Restaurant name - "Bone-in Ribeye"





Market name - "Boneless Rib Roast" or "Ribeye Roast"
Restaurant name - "Prime Rib" (usually, but not always, with the ribs and "lifter" (the top edge of meat separated from the bulk of the meat by a line of fat - see picture above) removed or "Ribeye".


Pork is a little different. The "backstrap" of a pig is roughly comparable to the "prime rib" of beef. The "center rib chops" and the "loin chops" in the picture are roughly equivalent to "prime rib". "Center loin" would be "T-bone/Porterhouse" territory and "sirloin end chops" would be roughly equal to "boneless top sirloin" in beef.


 
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