Question about food plot

Jari

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I want to try a food plot to go in front of my trail cam,I've never done this before,but I've read that a Brassica mix is the best..I just wanna know if the ground has to be tilled to soil,or just spread on the surface(its grassy field now)Or just poke holes in the surface for each seed?
Also,do I have to get a bag of the special deer food seed,or would I just be able to get a mix of seed at the local feed store?And if so,exactly what seeds should I get?
Thanks...

I know this isn't really meant for the trail cam forum,,,//sorry..but you're the guys I know..
 



dtrushto

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I've used brassica the past 2 seasons. I live in MI. The pictures shown here are pictures of my spring plot after about 3-4 weeks of growth. I've always tilled the soil, limed and fertilized. I've always broadcasted the seed and have had pretty good luck. I didn't have to cover the seed with any soil...just tilled, broadcast and let'er go...some precip helps tremendously. It normally germinates in 4-5 days (mine did anyhow). I used the brand name Biologic Maximum and I've also used a cheaper Gander Mtn brand and had great luck with both as far as growth. I'm sure you could go to your local grain/seed place and pic some up and not pay the high $$ and get the same results.

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s106/dt...to/S4020010.jpg
http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s106/dt...to/S4020003.jpg
 

Jari

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Thanks,,
I was looking at stuff like this <http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=250231169037&ssPageName=MERCOSI_VI_ROSI_PR4_PCN_BIX_Stores&refitem=250224639764&itemcount=4&refwidgetloc=closed_view_item&refwidgettype=osi_widget&_trksid=p284.m185&_trkparms=algo%3DSI%26its%3DI%252BIA%26itu%3DCR%252BIA%252BUCI%26otn%3D4%26ps%3D42>

this is gonna be fun..
 

wtnhunt

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Guess it will depend on where you are. Brassicas mixes here are about worthless, the deer just do not seem to have any interest in them. Have watched them walk through or past the brassicas mix to graze on grass. Have planted a mix that looked great the past two years in a row, and the deer have not hit them like they have other plots we have planted in the fall in the past. Had tried biologic full draw previously before that and thought it was just the biologic brand, but guess not. Best fall plantings we have here tend to be with mixes of grains, wintergrazer rye and winter wheat both do well and are good draws. Oats would be another good choice. Will likely be planting grains with austrian winter peas here this fall.

If you are interested in a perenial mix, check out a blend of clovers, trefoil, and add some chickory in. Personally I use the trefoil grower blend from this grower. Have had great results with clovers and trefoil planted with chickory and wintergrazer rye as a nurse crop.
 

shufigo

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I'm just getting started on my food plot for the coming year. I have had experience with brassica (basically just turnips) and what I've found matches with what I've read in research. Deer won't always go and key directly onto any one feed to the exclusion of others. They go to what has the best for them at the time. Brassicas don't have any sweetness or better greens than anything else - - until the other stuff dies back. Then brassicas come into their own. They stay green even after frost, and the maximum sugar buildup is late fall. Once the deer get a taste of the roots, they'll dig up each and every one - if there isn't anything else tastier for them available. Bottom line is brassica is a late season - even winter - food plot item.
 

wtnhunt

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (shufigo @ Apr 4 2008, 12:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
They go to what has the best for them at the time. Brassicas don't have any sweetness or better greens than anything else - - until the other stuff dies back. Then brassicas come into their own. They stay green even after frost, and the maximum sugar buildup is late fall. Once the deer get a taste of the roots, they'll dig up each and every one - if there isn't anything else tastier for them available. Bottom line is brassica is a late season - even winter - food plot item.[/b]
The state here said that food plots woud see a tremendous jump in activity after last years summer dought, if that were true, we should have had no turnips left in the ground. Like I said here, the deer do not hit them like I would have expected, we have tons of turnips and sugar beets in the ground. Not sure if it is because there are clover chickory plots nearby that still have some green or if it is due to some other available food such as mixed grass that was still green, but I will not plant brassicas mixes here anymore.
 

dgl1948

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Brassica covers a wide range of plants. (Canola, turnip, cabbage etc.) In order to start a foodplot you need to eliminate the cover that is growing now. (Roundup) Check your soil conditions. You can get a kit from just about any plant nursery. It seems in the US they need to add lime as there soil is acitic. Out here on the prairies it is the opposite. Ours is to alkeline. A little acid rain here would help. Not sure what yours would be. For seed you could email minka@sasktel.net. He sells specialty seeds and should be able to help you with selection. I think you need a mixture. The trick is to get something they want throughout the year. This means you need a selection of plants. He is also a deer nut and keeps up on this type of thing. As he is Canadian, it may be easier for you to get seed. I am not sure on the regulations on bringing seed acrooss the border.
 

thehunter

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I planted a some plot plus that had alot of turnips, brassica and rape seed mixed together. The deer loved it. It grew to about 12" high and then a little frost came around. The deer mowed it down to the ground and then pulled all of the turnips up and then ate the remaining stems. Planted in Sept. with my clover seeds and had stems by Nov.
 


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