Referrals to a good guide in N. CA?

IBAfoo

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Does anyone know of a guide for Turkeys in Northern CA?  I've hunted all my life, and turkeys for 2 years.  Would like to find a guide who is actually a turkey hunter.  Many of them just seem to do turkey hunts as a side thing and don't know much more about it than me.  

Email me, or just post any referrals.

Thanks in advance.
 

Whoadog

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 Cary Jellison in Auburn.  You will not meet a better guy and he is an outstanding guide with great properties. I take my wife with him every year, that way I don't have to guide her and just enjoy watching her.   (530)885-1492

Brian
 

Drake Slayer

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I'll second that for Cary. He has some great properties. I've gone with him once but my friend goes on 1-2 hunts a year.
 

Whoadog

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 I believe it is $225 and $100 additional if you kill a bird, be prepared to pay $325.  We have gone with him four times and have killed four birds with two of them being 10" and up.
Brian
 

mustystubs

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I just got a call from Cary.  I'm going with him on Monday.  Never been before so it should be quite an experience.  I called him several weeks ago and it sounded like he was booked up for the season but apparently he still has some weekday hunts left to fill.

Wish me luck.

P.S.  The price is $250 + $100 if you get a bird.  He also has some low percentage hunts on public land for $200.
 

Whoadog

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Stubs,
 You will learn so much from Cary if you are willing to listen and learn.  You will also have a great time and a good hunt.  I have hunted with him for several years, not just turkey, and you will not meet a better person let alone a great guide.  Have fun and let us know how you do.

Brian
 

Hillbilly

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Most turkey guides do other things because the season is so short, hence on the side. As for knowledge, there isn't a whole lot to know other than roosting a bird, set up and tree yelp. Call aggressively to the hens when the Tom is henned up, and be very patient. A good guide knows his property well and will get you where the birds are. If you scout and listen to the live hens you'll notice they sound horrible compared to our practiced calling. You'll also notice the articles you read all say the same thing over and over. How did your "part time" guides perform for you out of curiousity?
 

Whoadog

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 Yeah okay Hillbilly and turkeys can't fly, as my sister said years ago when I started hunting them and she thought they were a stupid bird that couldn't fly.

Brian
 

Hillbilly

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Turkey guides have only 5 weeks here for the spring season, hence the title"on the side". If it were a full time job they'd starve. A good guide will be prompt, have the turkeys pin-pointed prior to your arrival, and bring the bird to you. As far as knowledge goes, there really isn't a whole lot to it. Roost the Tom, set up in the morning an hour before light, and tree yelp softly. If the Tom is "henned up", you can either call agressively, and hope the dominant hen comes toward you bringing the Tom, or call softly to get her investigate. Subdominant Toms are an option in this case as well. read the articles out there and the just recycle the same knowledge over and over. I'm curious as to how these guides performed for you. Good Luck
 

Hillbilly

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I respect your opinion Brian, didn't mean to antagonize you. I do admit there are fly by night guides who do a crummy job. That's why I asked the poster what his results have been with the ignorant guides. That way we can all avoid them. Do you know of any guides who would take the time to roost a bird with the client the night before? Geez, don't be so sensitive and good luck out there!

PS- Sorry bout the double post... tech difficulty
 

E A Hunt

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300 bucks for a Turkey hunt????????????? Get real!!

I'll hook you up for 200. It aint that hard.

300 dollars is a joke.

Rent a boat for 50 bucks and cruise the shore while trolling for fish at Shasta Lake and when you hear a gobble gobble get out and start callin.

Cruise the foothills and find some birds on private land. Offer the land owner 50 to 100 bucks and 7 out of 10 times they will say OK.
 

Hillbilly

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Can one of you guys help me with viewing problem? It seems I don't see my posts unless I ad a new one. Strange, and I can't view replies( Be nice Brian!)
 

mustystubs

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I went with Cary on Monday.  It was just like Whoadog said.  Prime turkey areas, lots of birds, an expert guide, perfect weather.  Too bad I missed the first bird.  I had a flock headed my way while it was still too dark to clearly see if they wore beards.  As the first two birds crossed my field-of-fire no more than 25 feet away Cary told me to take the first bird after he saw its beard.  It was a long reach to the left and just then the bird stretched up in alarm causing me to shot right past his neck.  Then it was total chaos as turkeys jumped and flew everywhere.

You could see where the pattern tore into the grass and at the first mark was no more than three inches across.  I was expecting a longer shot.  As usual the unpredictable happened.

The turkeys milled around for another 30 minutes or so and then crossed a small creek.  We changed positions to a large rock about 20 feet away.  Just then the birds circled back behind us.  This time they came within about 15 feet but my back was too them.  They finally spooked and went back the way they came.

Cary called a little and three jakes came into view.  By this time I was leaning over the large rock we had just been pinned down behind.  I got a clear shot at a jake at about 40 yards and Cary told me to take it.  I had patterned my gun on Saturday and was pretty confident I could make the shot.  This time the bird dropped like a bad habit, kicked a little bit, flapped its wings slightly but stayed down.  One of the other jakes stood on the dead bird and picked up its head and dropped it repeatly.  Finally the other two jakes wandered off.

Cary took me back to his house where his wife treated me to oatmeal cookies and Cary's own deer hunting videos while he cleaned the bird.  It was a first-rate hunt even though I was disappointed I missed my first bird.  I can now appreciate the skill it takes to get a bird, especially on public land, which I understand Whoadog did on the opener.
 

Whoadog

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 Okay Stubs now I am pissed Nancy is suppose to make cookies only for me, her favorite,  where do you live in Woodalnd I am coming by tonight I can't take this abuse.  Seriously I am glad you had a good time as I knew you would.

Brian
 

mustystubs

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I cooked my bird yesterday.  I got a pack of those roaster bags, some onions, and some chicken broath at Raley's.  The bird wouldn't fit into the bag without cutting off the drumsticks so I did that and cooked them in a seperate bag.  I basted the bird with butter and garlic salt, stuffed it with quartered onions and poured in the chicken broath.  I set the oven for 325 and put the bird and drumsticks in.  I put a meat thermometer in the thigh.  After about two hours the thermometer read 180 so I turned off the stove and sampled the drumsticks.  Umm good.  I let the bird cool down and then boned the rest.  It tastes alot like domestic turkey but with zero fat.
 
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