Searching for pigs- public land

JustGuy

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Hi,
I wanted to start this thread which might help some n00bs ISO the elusive public land pigs.

Why public and not any...? it is because on private land they are not so illusive, and usually the owner tells you, Hey Johnny, loool on this river bad, or, they are coming every day at 4PM from this direction on this trail or something like this.

What i noticed after many conversations, texts, PMs with people who look for public land hunt among those who is serious and their goal is not to squeeze out of you your exact location, but those guys who want to learn and get it done the right way.
What i noticed, they have no idea what to look for, everyone say Find shelter, find food, find water. That is right, buy OK, practically OK, arrived to an area, so what? what to look for?
Apparently many of them do not know how rooting or rubbing look like, how the pigs poop looks like, the pigs trail.. ets.

The day before yesterday while PMing with one of the members of this forum i got a strong urge to go to see one part of LPNF which for years i heard about, drove by noticing that it might be promising but never got a chance to actually check on it. Took my water, binos and in Less than 2 hours drive i was there. $ hours walking and checking all possible and impossible location i was ready to give up, especially it was 4:30sh PM soon it is going to get dark and i had a long way back to my truck.
Went back in a little circle when in 5 minutes i found those:

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And this footprint as a confirmation :)) if i needed one

20180213_162607.jpg

Buy the look of it all this rooting was done last night. Those signs look like they were left by loan pig, most likely 120-150 loan boar.

No more signs of pigs were in the area no mater how hard i was looking around.

Back to my car it was getting real dark i decided to give myself 15 more minutes and try the other, "less promising" side of the road.

In less than 100 yards from my truck i found those:


20180213_180655.jpg

20180213_180712.jpg

It was already dark, so the pictures are not the best.
So, should i continue with my next day?
 
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Fredezee

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Awesome! And yes! Get back out there! good Luck!
 

JustGuy

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OK, needless to say that this bug is stronger than STD or even diarrhea...

The very next day, means yesterday, i was back to this area. Immediately started from where i left the other day>
Here are some pictures:

A little piglet was here and left the evidence. They already were a little hard from outside, means they were left two days ago.
And for a smart ones who wants to live a comment how i know that they are soft or crunchy, just slowly press on them with your boot, you will fill it, no need to touch, chew or any other contact unless you want it.

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Then some more rooting:
This looked like at least 5-6 pigs were working on those excavations.

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20180214_121448.jpg

Come footprints, only a day or two old:

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And finally, the cherry on the top, the most juicy detail, a big mama left me a message:

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Unfortunately i could not find any rubbing to show you. It is also a very important sign. It sow where they come from and presence of water/mud source and usually located close to a bedding area.
This means there is no water source close by and as soon as the grong drys down they might be gone from this area.
Also no bedding nor wallowing signs so far.

This post in no way intended to teach someone how to hunt, search for pigs, the intention was only to show how some of the signs of pig presence look like.

I guess you know what i'm going to be busy with in the near future...
 
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Stevehazard

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Not from a recent trip any where but did I find some pig sign here?

20170406_092027.jpg
 

Tech

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This is definitely help a noob. The area I have walked across, I have never seen anything like that. Thanks.
 

bisonic

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Congrats on finding some public land hog area, but I'm sorry to say it doesn't look like fresh rooting to me. Look at the grass that's been rooted up in the top pictures - it's all dead and dry. That takes a few days at least (depending on weather conditions). If it was the night before it would still be green. Also look at all of the leaves that have fallen into the rooted area and hoof print - unless it was really windy that day it probably took a few days to get that covered. They may still be around though so keep trying!
 

JustGuy

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Maybe in the picture it looks like that, but the dirt is still wet, and don't forget, it was sunny day and it after all day sun it still was wet.
And it is sunny slope.
The leaves were under the trees and just were overturned, and it was actually 36-40 hours after they rooted by my estimation. So, nevertheless for me it looked like an active area, but what would i know.
Will see next month when i come with cameras.

The point of this post was not to brag about a new spot but to show general signs of pigs' presence in an area, then what i call it, time to "develop" the area:
Put cameras, see when, where from, how many etc.

I hope some other experienced hunters can chime in with valuable info to help n00bs in their rough and rocky way to success.
 
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OPAH

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Here Here, this post has been a wealth of info for the not so experienced pig hunters.
Very much appreciated my fiends
 

flytrue

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I've seen rooting that I know was fresh because it wasn't there the day before. That being said, I've seen the same spot a week later after a light rain and it looked like it was only one day old. It's sometimes hard to tell.
 

JustGuy

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Yes, you are right, but there was no rain in the area for 3 weeks already AND AGAIN, the goal of this post was to show how pigs' presence looks like, that is it.
Please note, i never told about strategies, where to look, how to look, how to shoot, how to dress, Nothing, Nada, Zilch, only SOME samples of evidence of pigs presence.

I hope some experienced hunters would add their knowledge to this post
 

MariotheBarber

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Interesting post, I wish there were hunt-able pigs around me. None up here in the desert, although Ive heard rumors
 

JustGuy

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Sometimes you have to travel a little. In my case it is at least 1.5Hr drive
 

hntboar

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Just Guy- I can appreciate your post and what your attempting to do with the new hunters. I think new hunters will be able to appreciate the help in figuring out hogs. That said, pictures don’t always tell the complete story on the website. You made a judgement call on the number of hogs and the age of the rooting and tracks. Unless all of us are actually on site with you, i bet we would all come up with different timelines of the age of the rooting and tracks and the poop. But that is not your point, your trying to help educate some new hunters. I think your point is that your not trying to challenge your judgement but to help new hunters navigate the challenges with hunting hogs. The one thing i could add to helping new hunters, if and when you find fresh tracks, stay on them and follow them as far as you can. Even old tracks. Pigs are lazy and will use the same trails roads all the time. Follow tracks and eventually you will run into them. I realize that many times you will find them in the brush. You will hear them and at times see them or maybe smell them, best to sit back and just wait. Wait till it gets hot and best time is after noon. Find the tracks that went into the brush and grap your pistol and get on your hands and knees and continue to follow the tracks. Make sure you have walked the brush patch and ensure no tracks have exited the brush patch so you know that the pigs are still in the brush. Generally they bed down and sleep after noon. Go in slowly and working your way to thier bedding areas. Many times they are sleeping and may not even know your coming. That is the time you provide a rude awaking with a shot to the head. This is very scary hunting them this way but very fun. If they wake before you get to them, it can get really fun. LOL. Hope this helps new hunters!
 

JustGuy

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Great, thank you another good advise from Hnboar:"when you find fresh tracks, stay on them and follow them as far as you can"

Great guys, keep them coming


 

Tech

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Just Guy- I can appreciate your post and what your attempting to do with the new hunters. I think new hunters will be able to appreciate the help in figuring out hogs. That said, pictures don’t always tell the complete story on the website. You made a judgement call on the number of hogs and the age of the rooting and tracks. Unless all of us are actually on site with you, i bet we would all come up with different timelines of the age of the rooting and tracks and the poop. But that is not your point, your trying to help educate some new hunters. I think your point is that your not trying to challenge your judgement but to help new hunters navigate the challenges with hunting hogs. The one thing i could add to helping new hunters, if and when you find fresh tracks, stay on them and follow them as far as you can. Even old tracks. Pigs are lazy and will use the same trails roads all the time. Follow tracks and eventually you will run into them. I realize that many times you will find them in the brush. You will hear them and at times see them or maybe smell them, best to sit back and just wait. Wait till it gets hot and best time is after noon. Find the tracks that went into the brush and grap your pistol and get on your hands and knees and continue to follow the tracks. Make sure you have walked the brush patch and ensure no tracks have exited the brush patch so you know that the pigs are still in the brush. Generally they bed down and sleep after noon. Go in slowly and working your way to thier bedding areas. Many times they are sleeping and may not even know your coming. That is the time you provide a rude awaking with a shot to the head. This is very scary hunting them this way but very fun. If they wake before you get to them, it can get really fun. LOL. Hope this helps new hunters!
My blood got extra pumping by reading this. Damn it I am down to crawl into their hole if and when the opportunity presents. Thanks for sharing.
 

Bubblehide

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For those hunting southern and central Ca. We are currently in severe drought conditions, considering the time of year. There are very few green patches of grass, and what little there is, is very sparse. Almost everything is dry, very dry. Subsequently, the pigs are leaving very little sign. So, how do you go about finding sign during such conditions. Well, it can be tough, but you might consider taking a small rake (given no game cameras), and rake any areas that a pig will leave tracks, naturally; come back the next morning/day, and check the areas you've raked. Check any moist areas in which pigs might leave tracks. Obviously, these techniques work much better if your familiar with an area.

For those of you looking at trying new areas. I strongly suggest that you get to know what pig sign looks like (the above examples are awesome). Then, once we do get some rain, and the ground turns moist, the rooting will significantly pick up. That is the time to get your butts out in the field, and just start off covering as much ground as you can. Why, so you can find the areas the pigs are currently using. Make a note of the conditions, because under those same conditions, those pigs will likely return.

As far as water, when it's warm, yes they need water on a daily basis. When it's really hot, they will likely bed all day very very close to the water, using it to regulate their body temperatures, as stated above, pigs don't sweat, just like dogs don't. I'm sure if you've been around dogs, you have seen them during hot temperatures laying on a cold floor, whether it's shaded dirt or concrete and tile floors. They will spread their legs and get as much of their bellies touching the cool floor. What they are doing is regulating their body temp, by cooling it/keeping it from overheating. However, right now, with the cold temps we have, water just isn't that important to them. Yes they still need to drink. But at this time of the year, they will travel miles from water, and bed miles from water. So, you could find them close, or far from water.
 

garlicsalt

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For those hunting southern and central Ca. We are currently in severe drought conditions, considering the time of year. There are very few green patches of grass, and what little there is, is very sparse. Almost everything is dry, very dry. Subsequently, the pigs are leaving very little sign. So, how do you go about finding sign during such conditions. Well, it can be tough, but you might consider taking a small rake (given no game cameras), and rake any areas that a pig will leave tracks, naturally; come back the next morning/day, and check the areas you've raked. Check any moist areas in which pigs might leave tracks. Obviously, these techniques work much better if your familiar with an area.

For those of you looking at trying new areas. I strongly suggest that you get to know what pig sign looks like (the above examples are awesome). Then, once we do get some rain, and the ground turns moist, the rooting will significantly pick up. That is the time to get your butts out in the field, and just start off covering as much ground as you can. Why, so you can find the areas the pigs are currently using. Make a note of the conditions, because under those same conditions, those pigs will likely return.

As far as water, when it's warm, yes they need water on a daily basis. When it's really hot, they will likely bed all day very very close to the water, using it to regulate their body temperatures, as stated above, pigs don't sweat, just like dogs don't. I'm sure if you've been around dogs, you have seen them during hot temperatures laying on a cold floor, whether it's shaded dirt or concrete and tile floors. They will spread their legs and get as much of their bellies touching the cool floor. What they are doing is regulating their body temp, by cooling it/keeping it from overheating. However, right now, with the cold temps we have, water just isn't that important to them. Yes they still need to drink. But at this time of the year, they will travel miles from water, and bed miles from water. So, you could find them close, or far from water.
Now thats informative, thanks mang.
 

hntboar

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My blood got extra pumping by reading this. Damn it I am down to crawl into their hole if and when the opportunity presents. Thanks for sharing.
Tech
When you hunt hogs in the brush with a pistol it is hard to not want to do it all the time. If you can find them in the brush, it is a hoot. But to be honest it gets scary at times. They can be right in front of you and you cant see them. But you can hear them smell them. They will hold there ground many times and not move but clack their tusks and try to scare you. They at times will round around in circles around you. Pretty intense time. If you do this, please share your story would love to hear about it. I like teaching people this hunt style but it takes time to learn and you have to be a little edgy. LOL!
 


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