Shooting Beavers in their Environment

R

Rflesh

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One of the projects I am working on is at a Beaver Preserve. There is a family of beavers 8 to 12, on a preserve, which I have been taking some photos. I have visited their dam, seen them from a distance at various times of the day and nite. Although curious, it is very difficult to get close to them. Hence the need for remote cameras.

As I looked on the photo gallery I saw many great photos as well as ones that could be almost great, but the animal was cut off, angle off or whatever. We are tied to what the animal does.

My questions is can one attache multiple cameras to one LED senso and have them all go off at the same time. Would it just be a matter of connected through jacks or hardwire to the same place as one camera. If this is possible some interesting alternatives are available. For my purposes, It would allor me to do an overhead shot, a close-up and a far or another angle all of the same animal.  Your thoughts please.

Also along that same vein, all things being equal in making a remote camera with sensor completly waterproof, would it work underwater in say two to three feet of water. Would the sensor trip? Is water clarity a problem, would the water itself make the sensor trip?

Thanks for the input

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Jaggermax

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For distances or more than 10 feet from the sensor, I would look into using a wireless RF transmitter that is attached to the sensor and then have multiple cameras which each have their own RF receiver.  There are many RF transmitter and receiver kits on the market and they are fairly cheap.  I saw a Kit that was$25 for both the transmitter and receiver and it had about a 100 foot range.  There are also a number of schematics on the NET if you feel like building them from scratch.  There are a number of RF tranmitter and receiver chips which require very few additional parts to work.    

You could fairly easily take the sensor output line that normally drives the relay coil and instead connect it to the trigger of a 555 timer based oneshot (5 second pulse for example).  The output of the oneshot can be connected to enable the RF transmitter.  When the sensor is activated, the oneshot turns on and the transmitter "transmits" for 5 seconds, long enough for the recievers to detect the signal and snap a picture.  

For the receiver, simply connect the output of the reciever to a relay which can fire the camera.  Depending on the reciever used, you may even be able to drive the camera directly from the receiver. Plus the reciever operate off of very low power, so a single 9 volt battery can power it for months.  

With this layout, you could place additional RF camera/receivers whenever you want and you do not even have to connect any wires.  You just have to make sure that each receiver you use is tuned to the Sensor/Transmitter.  

I have been considering doing this with the game cam I am building just so I can easly move the camera so I can get some wider angle shots.  If I get is going, I will post a picture and schematics.  

(Edited by Jaggermax at 2:43 am on April 29, 2001)
 
R

Rflesh

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Jaggermax,

Thanks for the input. The concept of Cameras being triggered by radio frequency is really too much. It never entered my mind. I am there as soon as I can perfect the first few cameras. What a great concept. My mind didn't make the leap, I have used radio frequency flash units for photography, its a natural step.

Thanks
 

NC Bowhunter

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Another easy way to have a remote RF controlled camera is to use a wireless doorbell.  I used a wireless doorbell from Walmart for $12 and a RS sensor to set of an alarm in our house when a raccoon or anything else came into a trout feeder we have nearby, so we could keep them from climbing in and stealing all of the food.  This worked pretty well, but it might be cheaper to buy a kit if you are using several receivers.  Good luck.
 

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