Sneezing in the field...what do you do

rdrrm8e

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I had a problem this weekend with my GWP in the field. The area was loaded with foxtails and pollen and tiny airborne seeds.

When I got home Molly went into a tizzy sneezing and pawing at her nose. She was running around and rubbing her nose against any corner she could find.

When I talked to the trainer today he says he carries a syringe of olive oil in his truck. He says 1-2 CC's of oil into the snout will initiate a swallow reflex and stop the sneezing and allow the dog to swallow the foxtail. He said in a pinch he has spit into the dog's snout.

Any other ideas or experiences?
 

jackrabbit

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I would not try anything like that without verifying the procedure with a vet in advance. It may be that oil, or spit, may indeed saturate a foxtail enough to be swallowed (good or bad thing?) or to be lubricated enough to be sneezed out the snout. I would hate to think of a well lubricated foxtail working its way faster up a sinus passage into the brain or other structures though. I can see that it could be a beneficial thing to moisten/lubricate seeds or pollen to be snorted out or swallowed, but what if it is actually a foxtail???? I would guess that a foxtail in the gut MAY likely be rendered harmless, but I would really worry if the foxtail made it unto other cranial structures. And I always thought that the dogs nasal passages were always moist to begin with. Interesting question for a vet though.
 

One Track

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I had the exact same thing happen this past weekend. I loaded up Duke and headed for the vet. I told Duke that we were going to see the doctor and he quit sneezing. The vet did an inspection and couldn't see a foxtail. He suggested that I leave Duke so he could anesthetize him and go up the snout with a camera, $$$. (Better safe than sorry.) It had been an hour since Duke quit sneezing. I decided to pass. The vet said that it could have been pollen, dirt, a bee, etc. Or, that a foxtail passed thru or was blown out. He's been fine ever since. If he starts to show any symptoms of discomfort, I would definitely return for the full exam.

Duke's breeder also suggested spitting or squirting mineral oil up the snout.

The vet did find that Duke had a yeast infection in his ears, for which I got the meds. This was due to a lot of swimming.
 

jackrabbit

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Did a quick search on the internet and indeed mineral oil is recommended to be put in the snout as drops, not squirted.

"Nose: For a foxtail in the nose, the obvious symptoms are spasmodic and serial sneezing. If blood comes from the nose as a consequence of sneezing, you are almost assured it is a foxtail. First aid treatment is to drop (not squirt) some oil into the nose. Mineral oil is best but baby or vegetable oil can be used. The oil will soften the foxtail, so hopefully, it will not continue to burrow. The oil is for the dog’s comfort as well as to help stop the foxtail from poking the sensitive nasal passages. But again, get your dog to a vet quickly. Once at the vet, the dog will be anesthetized, its nose scoped, and the foxtail found and removed."
 

gundogs

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Jack is right! Visually inspect for blood , if blood is present go to the nearest vet. Should the sneezing be caused by a reaction to chemicals, dust or pollen I would suggest a gentle flush with some clear water from a water bottle. You certainly do not want the dog to ingest a foxtail so the olive oil idea makes no sense at all.
 

rdrrm8e

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I was under the impression dogs can pass foxtails in the gut. Maybe digests is a better word.

Are you saying this is not so?
 

gundogs

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Dogs do not have digestive enzymes capable of completely digesting plant matter and anything capable of piercing tissue and flesh would not be good in the small or large intestine. Recently a friends dog inhaled a foxtail, it entered the lung caused infection to the lung and soft tissues while continuing to work its way between the ribs and finally being contained in a large abcess under the skin midway along the rib cage. When this was drained ia foxtail was found to be the cause of the infection and prolonged illness.
I would think this could happen to the intestine and cause severe infection. I would certainly check with a Vet. before adopting such a procedure. I know a lubricant is employed by the Vet. when attempting to extract foreign objects from the nasal passage. I have been a trainer for many years and as such feel that it is partly my duty to minimize the exposure to areas infested with foxtails and star thistle. In the event of such an accident I would seek the help of my Vet. for treatment.
 

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