Special Forces Get High-Tech Gear

spectr17

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Special Forces Get High-Tech Gear

Mar 12, 2002

By MATT KELLEY, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON - When U.S. special forces troops began directing airstrikes
in Afghanistan they quickly discovered they needed different equipment to pinpoint targets.

In less than two weeks, the Pentagon had shipped them high-tech binoculars that use a laser to calculate the precise coordinates of a target, special forces commanders told a Senate panel
Tuesday.

"As soon as it was approved, we could go out and buy it," said Harry
Schulte, the top purchasing executive for the U.S. Special Operations
Command.

The war against terrorism has smoothed the way for American commandos
to get what they need quickly, Schulte and Gen. Charles Holland, head
of the special operations command, told a Senate Armed Services
subcommittee.

President Bush's 2003 budget request calls for a 10
percent increase - about $430 million - in research and development for
special forces, the clandestine operatives who have been at the front
lines of the U.S. ground war in Afghanistan.

The budget proposal also calls for a $350 million increase in money to
buy equipment for special operations forces soldiers, Schulte said.

The overall budget for special operations forces would rise from $4
billion this year to about $4.9 billion next year under Bush's plan.
Both represent about 1.3 percent of the overall Pentagon budget.

Schulte and Holland showed off examples of several of the high-tech
gadgets that the commandos use. The new laser range-finder delivered to
troops last October looks like an elongated pair of binoculars. A wire
from the range-finder attaches to a handheld global positioning system
(news - web sites) unit that displays the precise coordinates of the
target.

The soldiers then use a new radio - which looks like a common
walkie-talkie - to relay the coordinates directly to the pilots who
drop satellite-guided bombs onto the targets. Those new radios replace
up to nine separate radios the commandos once had to use to communicate
with each other and with aircraft, Holland said.

The radio has seen its first combat use in Afghanistan, where it has
been "exceptionally effective," Holland said.

The military is working on a system of robotic explosive sensors to
check vehicles entering military bases in Afghanistan and other
countries, Schulte said. That system should be ready for use in the
next several months, he said.

Special operations forces also are involved in developing several other
futuristic technologies, including "high bandwidth" communications to
quickly transfer large amounts of information. Researchers are looking
for ways to make aircraft, vehicles and individual soldiers harder for
enemies to detect.

Holland's command is scheduled to take over development of the
"advanced tactical laser," a high-energy laser weapon. The special
operations forces are also researching ways to develop smaller, more
powerful batteries to run all of their high-tech equipment.

"If you're carrying batteries, you're not carrying that much food or
water or ammunition," Schulte said.

End article

=====================================================

Some have asked that since SA (selective availibility), is turned off now, does the civilian GPS units work as accurate as the military GPS units.

Sam Wormley's response.

The military uses PPS signals which are encrypted P(Y) and require codes to access them.  They
are available to the military and selected authorized users.  They are not
available to the general civilian community.  The Survey community makes
use of the P(Y) codes on L1 and L2 without any decryption.

The military enjoys higher resistance to jamming, better ionospheric
corrections, and signals that allow operation in high dynamics environments
(altitude, velocity, acceleration, and jerk).
 



spectr17

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Special Forces Get High-Tech Gear

Mar 12, 2002

By MATT KELLEY, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON - When U.S. special forces troops began directing airstrikes
in Afghanistan they quickly discovered they needed different equipment to pinpoint targets.

In less than two weeks, the Pentagon had shipped them high-tech binoculars that use a laser to calculate the precise coordinates of a target, special forces commanders told a Senate panel
Tuesday.

"As soon as it was approved, we could go out and buy it," said Harry
Schulte, the top purchasing executive for the U.S. Special Operations
Command.

The war against terrorism has smoothed the way for American commandos
to get what they need quickly, Schulte and Gen. Charles Holland, head
of the special operations command, told a Senate Armed Services
subcommittee.

President Bush's 2003 budget request calls for a 10
percent increase - about $430 million - in research and development for
special forces, the clandestine operatives who have been at the front
lines of the U.S. ground war in Afghanistan.

The budget proposal also calls for a $350 million increase in money to
buy equipment for special operations forces soldiers, Schulte said.

The overall budget for special operations forces would rise from $4
billion this year to about $4.9 billion next year under Bush's plan.
Both represent about 1.3 percent of the overall Pentagon budget.

Schulte and Holland showed off examples of several of the high-tech
gadgets that the commandos use. The new laser range-finder delivered to
troops last October looks like an elongated pair of binoculars. A wire
from the range-finder attaches to a handheld global positioning system
(news - web sites) unit that displays the precise coordinates of the
target.

The soldiers then use a new radio - which looks like a common
walkie-talkie - to relay the coordinates directly to the pilots who
drop satellite-guided bombs onto the targets. Those new radios replace
up to nine separate radios the commandos once had to use to communicate
with each other and with aircraft, Holland said.

The radio has seen its first combat use in Afghanistan, where it has
been "exceptionally effective," Holland said.

The military is working on a system of robotic explosive sensors to
check vehicles entering military bases in Afghanistan and other
countries, Schulte said. That system should be ready for use in the
next several months, he said.

Special operations forces also are involved in developing several other
futuristic technologies, including "high bandwidth" communications to
quickly transfer large amounts of information. Researchers are looking
for ways to make aircraft, vehicles and individual soldiers harder for
enemies to detect.

Holland's command is scheduled to take over development of the
"advanced tactical laser," a high-energy laser weapon. The special
operations forces are also researching ways to develop smaller, more
powerful batteries to run all of their high-tech equipment.

"If you're carrying batteries, you're not carrying that much food or
water or ammunition," Schulte said.
 

spectr17

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Special Forces Get High-Tech Gear

Mar 12, 2002

By MATT KELLEY, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON - When U.S. special forces troops began directing airstrikes
in Afghanistan they quickly discovered they needed different equipment to pinpoint targets.

In less than two weeks, the Pentagon had shipped them high-tech binoculars that use a laser to calculate the precise coordinates of a target, special forces commanders told a Senate panel
Tuesday.

"As soon as it was approved, we could go out and buy it," said Harry
Schulte, the top purchasing executive for the U.S. Special Operations
Command.

The war against terrorism has smoothed the way for American commandos
to get what they need quickly, Schulte and Gen. Charles Holland, head
of the special operations command, told a Senate Armed Services
subcommittee.

President Bush's 2003 budget request calls for a 10
percent increase - about $430 million - in research and development for
special forces, the clandestine operatives who have been at the front
lines of the U.S. ground war in Afghanistan.

The budget proposal also calls for a $350 million increase in money to
buy equipment for special operations forces soldiers, Schulte said.

The overall budget for special operations forces would rise from $4
billion this year to about $4.9 billion next year under Bush's plan.
Both represent about 1.3 percent of the overall Pentagon budget.

Schulte and Holland showed off examples of several of the high-tech
gadgets that the commandos use. The new laser range-finder delivered to
troops last October looks like an elongated pair of binoculars. A wire
from the range-finder attaches to a handheld global positioning system
(news - web sites) unit that displays the precise coordinates of the
target.

The soldiers then use a new radio - which looks like a common
walkie-talkie - to relay the coordinates directly to the pilots who
drop satellite-guided bombs onto the targets. Those new radios replace
up to nine separate radios the commandos once had to use to communicate
with each other and with aircraft, Holland said.

The radio has seen its first combat use in Afghanistan, where it has
been "exceptionally effective," Holland said.

The military is working on a system of robotic explosive sensors to
check vehicles entering military bases in Afghanistan and other
countries, Schulte said. That system should be ready for use in the
next several months, he said.

Special operations forces also are involved in developing several other
futuristic technologies, including "high bandwidth" communications to
quickly transfer large amounts of information. Researchers are looking
for ways to make aircraft, vehicles and individual soldiers harder for
enemies to detect.

Holland's command is scheduled to take over development of the
"advanced tactical laser," a high-energy laser weapon. The special
operations forces are also researching ways to develop smaller, more
powerful batteries to run all of their high-tech equipment.

"If you're carrying batteries, you're not carrying that much food or
water or ammunition," Schulte said.

End article

=====================================================

Some have asked that since SA (selective availibility), is turned off now, does the civilian GPS units work as accurate as the military GPS units.

Sam Wormley's response.

The military uses PPS signals which are encrypted P(Y) and require codes to access them.  They
are available to the military and selected authorized users.  They are not
available to the general civilian community.  The Survey community makes
use of the P(Y) codes on L1 and L2 without any decryption.

The military enjoys higher resistance to jamming, better ionospheric
corrections, and signals that allow operation in high dynamics environments
(altitude, velocity, acceleration, and jerk).
 

Tominator

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Do you know if their units utilize DGPS without the need for a base station? I wonder if their accuracy comes from linked base stations that receive data from OTH satellites. Commercially available survey grade GPS is capable of 1 cm accuracy.
Tominator
 


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