Temporarily disabled, what an eye opener.

They say you take for granted the things you have. Aint that the truth.
Early December i was on a dirtbike ride and broke my leg pretty bad. Plates, screws and all that jazz. Unfortunately the first surgery was done by someone who i would politely classify as "not an expert" so i had to go in for a second surgery on the 26th to repair his mistakes.
My right leg is completely out of commission for at least 6 months minimum and it will be a year before i can start loading my leg with weight and get outside. ( I am getting married in July and the doc says i'll not be able to walk my then. Oh well, i'll have dear ol dad walk me down the aisle. lol.)
Before i get too carried away i certainly dont claim to understand what it must be like to be actually disabled, as i still have full use of my other leg and i am expecting a full recovery. But through all my injuries i have never been laid up like this before. I've never had to rely on a wheelchair, never had to rely on my significant other to help me do something as simple as help me get dressed in the morning. So this is not a "boo hoo hoo, poor me" thread but more of a "wow, you guys are bad ass" thread.

Since the accident i have watched more TV then i have in the past decade combined. The couch has a permanent indentation from my ass and just as of today i can stand for more than 10 minutes at a time. So i can now finally take a shower without having to sit down. Hopefully next week i can spend some time at the reloading bench doing menial tasks like cleaning, de-priming and trimming brass. With my current narcotic load i don't trust myself to start loading yet. Better safe then dead is what Grandpa used to say.
I am healing, but the process has been extremely slow and frustrating. Im not sure if i am helping or hurting my mental situation but all i have been watching lately are hunting shows. :smiley_doh:
Bow hunting, ground squirrels, coyotes, hog, backpack hunting, air gun hunting and just on my way to work today as i was struggling getting into the building in my wheelchair it started sinking in how good i had it and took my opportunities for granted.

Over the past few weeks i have been trolling this thread looking at all the pictures and stories you guys post up and i have to give a heartfelt thank you for the motivation. You are certainly earning respect from me and this has definitely been an eye opening experience about the challenges you face on a daily basis.

Jeff
 

ChrisAMX

Well-known member
A year ago I could barely walk and had to get a hip replacement in May. It gets better; after rest therapy I was able to hunt x-10 in Septemeber and D-13 in October, so hang in there.
 

inchr48

Moderator
Moderator
Firstly, wishes for a speedy recovery.

Secondly, get an air gun and a BB trap. Lots of fun to shoot 3 or 5 shot groups to compete against yourself or a partner. Beats all the TV.

Best of luck, and congrats on your impending Nuptials.
 

Caninelaw

Banned
About the same happened to me several years ago. It really does open your eyes. You will find driving is even a challenge with your right leg messed up. (The only good part of mine is I did it at work so everything was covered).

BTW - if you want to really handicap yourself for hunting then get married....J/K...couldn't resist that one though. The comedians union would cancel my card if I passed that one up...
 

dblsmk

Well-known member
i had my right hip replaced also and they had to go back in and repair it. Seems the cup imbedded in the pelvis slipped or loosened up, Kind of reminded me of a to small a ball for the coupler on a trailer. I could feel the thing clanking as I tried walking. This was all 9 mos. after a triple bypass operation.
Finally my point, I camoed my walker,right down to the tennis balls, rigged a sling for my shotgun. hooked up a carrier for my extenda reach and went dove hunting anyway. Even tho my pain level went up and I was limited on my shooting style, what a mental boost. It was what the doctor told me not to do, but, it was the right thing for me to do at the time.
You can be creative and keep active as possible without hurting yourself with just a little thought and planning. I beleive the things I did speeded my recovery, it might help yours. It sure made me a lot easier to be around and more positive in my thinking.
 

Bubblehide

Well-known member
Jeff, I can feel for you. Like many, I went through an injury that took me a good 2+ years to recover from. I'm not 100% where I was, and I never will be; But I also can't complain as I can still hike most people into the ground. I just need to keep in mind that I have limits. That term, "limits" is an exceptionally important concept throughout the healing process; it took me a long long time to fully realize it. I can't tell you how many times I over did it, and delayed my recovery. Luckily, I didn't do any damage during my over-doing-it. Unlike others here, my doctors were telling me to get out there and do the things I enjoyed. This would generally be good advice for most people. But unlike most people, for every mile a normal person would go, I went 5 to 10. I simply need 3 to 4 days to recover every time I got out. after a while it was only 2 to 3 days down (without leaving the house). After a while, I finally realized that what I needed was to fully heal before engaging in my preferred activities, and then I needed to severely curtail the level I was accustomed to and slowly build up from there.

My wishes for a speedy recovery go out to you.
 

cjack

Well-known member
Jeff, I can feel for you. Like many, I went through an injury that took me a good 2+ years to recover from. I'm not 100% where I was, and I never will be; But I also can't complain as I can still hike most people into the ground. I just need to keep in mind that I have limits. That term, "limits" is an exceptionally important concept throughout the healing process; it took me a long long time to fully realize it. I can't tell you how many times I over did it, and delayed my recovery. Luckily, I didn't do any damage during my over-doing-it. Unlike others here, my doctors were telling me to get out there and do the things I enjoyed. This would generally be good advice for most people. But unlike most people, for every mile a normal person would go, I went 5 to 10. I simply need 3 to 4 days to recover every time I got out. after a while it was only 2 to 3 days down (without leaving the house). After a while, I finally realized that what I needed was to fully heal before engaging in my preferred activities, and then I needed to severely curtail the level I was accustomed to and slowly build up from there.

My wishes for a speedy recovery go out to you.
Congratulations skin_burmer on the upcoming marriage and hope your recovery goes smooth from here on. Bubblehide, I can totaly relate! This could have been written by me and explains exactly what I've been going through since I broke my ankle in November.

Hang in there, every day are baby steps, you don't always notice improvement but you will slowly gain back your life!
 
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Jeff,
when I was in high school my best friend and I were on a ride. We both raced desert together and could never imagine being disabled. On our way home to his garage he was hit, and drug by a pick up. The driver intentionally hit him, drug him under his truck for 3 city blocks untill he started swerving back n forth to shake him lose. To make a long story short, my best friend was now paralyzed, and on his death bed.
Well he didn't get feeling back in his legs but he lived. We also hunted together. I made him a promise that he'd ride, hunt, and fish again no matter what I had to do. Through the rest of my high school days I donated all my time to my buddy. I did funraisers, and we got his dirtbike fabbed up by another racing buddy of mine. It's real hard to explain unless you know whats gotta be done so I won't go into detail, but nevertheless, I got him back on a bike, back into the woods, and back on the water. It is remarcable what disabled people go through to do what we take for granite on a daily basis. I wish I had a ton of money so I could help disabled children go on the hunt of a lifetime.
 


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