The Mighty 2 Bore Boxlock M/Ler

CowboyCS

Well-known member
Thank you Belchfire, I am very happy with the way that piece turned out, kinda looks like it grew there. That was actually one of the toughest inletting jobs I have ever done, there are a lot of complex angles to work down into the wood with that shape.

I probably will video some of the shooting when the times comes. Right now I'm still looking for volunteers. You have to shoot it a minimum of twice with a full service charge, so I can make sight corrections, but I would be happy to make a nice steak(homegrown beef) dinner for anyone willing to come to my place and shoot it a couple times. Any Takers??????

Colin
 

inchr48

Moderator
Moderator
I love steak, but I like my bones in the positions they are now more.

Good Luck to the volunteer. Very unique project there Cowboy.
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
Thank You.

Just think of the bragging rights, how many people will be able to say they have shot a bigger rifle than you.

Colin
 

richracer1

Well-known member
I probably will video some of the shooting when the times comes. Right now I'm still looking for volunteers. You have to shoot it a minimum of twice with a full service charge, so I can make sight corrections, but I would be happy to make a nice steak(homegrown beef) dinner for anyone willing to come to my place and shoot it a couple times. Any Takers??????

Colin
Wow, seeking volunteers.......:lol bashing sign:

Lets see, I can put 100lbs on my Lead Sled, do you thing I can get another 100-200lbs on it to tame the recoil................?:skeered:
 

BelchFire

I speak fluent Vise-Grip
Admin
... or lengthening your right arm? :skeered:

You haven't even finished it yet, and I've already developed a flinch!
 

myfriendis410

Well-known member
You've gotta admit, Cowboy; it is kind of amusing.

I remember reading that back in the day there was a controversy between the big bore guys and the smaller faster guys that predated the O'Conner/Keith catfight. I keep wanting to say Selous was a big fan of the 4 Bore, but I could be mistaken. In any event, building that gun brings back a bit of the heyday of the African safari when it was a real life or death experience. (Read about Sir Richard Burton--what an adventurer!)

What you're doing is just plain cool.
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
Toe Plate. This is just another attempt to add more weight. This started out as a piece of flat stock ½” x 1”. It was shaped and inlet the same way as the comb plate.





Colin
 

BelchFire

I speak fluent Vise-Grip
Admin
I'm loving this. That's some beautimus work CS.

I have one question, though. The recoil pad and the comb don't blend in the same line; there's a pronounced change in shape where they meet. Is there a reason for that?
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
I'm not sure what you mean Belchfire, if you could explain in more detail I'd appreciate it. I think it might just be an optical illusion from the way I took the photos, the spacer plate was traced right off the recoil pad for it's shape, and the comb plate has the same contour as the top of the spacer plate.

Colin
 

BelchFire

I speak fluent Vise-Grip
Admin
They say a picture is worth 1000 words. But it uses up 100,000 times the memory............

Why isn't this a straight line?
 

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CowboyCS

Well-known member
I see what you are asking now. 3 reasons, 1: If i had moved the toe line up so that it would run in one straight line through the Pad, I would loose almost 3/8" of wood off the bottom of the stock. Which in this size of a gun the more you can get the better. 2: In order to keep that straight line and also keep the architecture of the stock the same, would mean trimming the bottom of the pad to match the angle, this isn't a hard thing to do with a 12" bench grinder but it does reduce the working surface area of the pad, and once again the more the merrier with this much recoil.
The final thing is that the recoil pad being one smooth line along the toe is primarily an American feature that came about in the early 1900's. If you look at the traditional Recoil Pads, that were fitted to British rifles of the late 1800's you will notice that a great deal of them have the same transition from angled to squared off that this has. So for traditional looks this is actually closer, but it's not what we as Americans are used to seeing because all of our rifles have been fitted the other way for the last hundred years.
I'm not absolutely sure this is why the British did it this way but I have a pretty good guess, the first recoil pads were pure rubber, and then they were covered in a fine hand stitched leather cover that was fitted almost seamlessly to the wood. When it comes to forming leather I would think it would be a lot harder to get he leather to pull in and fit smoothly over the pad on an acute angle, then it would be to mold the shape over a basic 90 degree radius. The closest thing we can get today to an original recoil pad is a Silvers Pad, but all they are is the rubber part, you still have to find someone with the skill to leather cover them and I only know of a couple people in this country who can do it and make it look like the originals. It's a fairly time consuming process to soften leather and then mold it around a pad with no seams.

Colin
 

BelchFire

I speak fluent Vise-Grip
Admin
Ask and ye shall receive. I'd like to think that I know half as much about ANYTHING as you seem to know about the classics of the design whys and wherefores.

That's gonna be a monster; I'm still trying to figure out how I can finagle a road trip to Kansas for the festivities when you finish it. Gonna be some MIGHTY fireworks......
 

Speckmisser

Well-known member
Awesomer and awesomer... That's some pretty work, Colin!

As far as test firing and regulating the sights, all joking aside, why not use a Lead Sled instead of relying on the shoulders of poor victims...err... volunteers?
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
Thank you.
As to the Lead Sled, I know a Big Bore fanatic that tried to use his lead sled to sight in a 2 bore last year, he couldn't get enough weight on it and he tried it anyways and broke it. I'm not going to risk breaking mine. I actually have a set of drawings for an old recoil test bed, that works on hinged legs and springs and counter weights. I own a large piece of property and have my own Range, set up out to 300 yards, so I am thinking about building a permanent one next to my regular shooting bench. As I get older shooting Big Bores is starting to take more of a toll on me, so I'm going to have to do something eventually anyways. I might as well just build something now and be done with it.

Colin
 

Speckmisser

Well-known member
I was wondering about that. That's a LOT of recoil.

Personally, while there's a part of me that would love to touch off a 2-bore at least once, I'm not sure my body will put up with it. After only a day at the SHOT Show range where I shot nothing bigger than .458, I was stove up in my neck and shoulder for a few days afterward. Heck, I even had to put a brake on my 30-06 to handle a full day at the range.
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
When it comes to Big Bores a lot of it is just conditioning. I regularly shoot my .458 Win Mag. I have worked up loads and sight in more than a few Big Bore(.62 cal and up). If you do it often enough and you stay reasonably fit and most importantly know proper shooting techniques, how to let your body roll with the recoil, stance, etc. then most of the really big bores aren't that bad for a few shots. But once you step up into 4 Bores and 2 Bores you can pretty much throw all that away and just expect to take a beating. This will be my first go around with a 2 Bore, but I have enough experience with 4 Bores to know what is coming.

Colin
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
Adding more weight. The final place I can add any serious amount of weight to this rifle is in the Buttstock. I considered my options and decided the best way to add the maximum amount of weight was to make a set of steel pipe lead filled plugs and then epoxy them in. The center one above the through rod is 1 3/8” O.D. and the two smaller ones are 5/8” O.D.. I could have gone with a slightly larger one above the large center one, but because of the angle of the comb and the middle plug it would have been fairly short in length so I opted for smaller but longer. I put all three pipes in my lathe and cut some fast rough threads in them so that the epoxy would be able to get into the grooves and form a mechanical lock. The idea being that I don’t want to lose any strength in the stock, so I want the steel to make up for the loss of wood structure.



I didn’t have a 1 3/8” drill bit to make the large hole for the big plug, so I improvised a little and modified a tool to do the job. I actually don’t care for spade bits when it comes to drilling large diameter holes, they tend to tear out and cut crooked, so to over come that I turned a piece of 3/8” round stock and split it down the middle and soldered it over the tip to create a piloted bit. Then it was easy to drill a 3/8” hole to depth and follow it up with the spade bit. The pilot worked very well and kept everything straight and kept the chatter and tearing down to a minimum.



With the holes drilled and the plug cut and filled with lead, I then mixed up some 2 part T-88 marine epoxy and started filling holes, I used lead shot to fill in any little gaps like the divets left from the drill bit tip. And the off set area between the back of the plug and the angle of the stock. With that all done and all the gaps filled in with epoxy and shot it’s now just a matter of waiting for the epoxy to dry. The plugs and shot added 4 pounds to the buttstock.


The epoxy also had the added benefit of sealing the end grain. When everything is set and dry, I will use a hammer to smooth out any high spots in the lead shot, so the butt spacer will seat back down flush to the wood.

Colin
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
Proofing the barreled action. I received the ball mould from Jeff Tanner yesterday, so with a little creative handle making (standard mould handles won’t fit this large of a mould), and a few wasted balls learning how to get the pour just right so as not to create any voids. I stripped the stock completely off the rifle, no point in damaging wood for no reason. Then I loaded it up with a double charge and double ball (1000grains of FFg, and two tightly patched round balls) Then I strapped it to a piece of railroad tie. I set a barrel full of dirt out in front of it with a 1” Steel backing plate to deflect the balls downward so I could recover the lead(no point in wasting a pound of lead for nothing), and then capped it and set it off with a string while hiding a safe distance behind my Tractor and Pickup Truck.

In the video you will see the white barrel full of dirt and steel plate to the right and the 2 Bore about 10 feet away to the left of it in the grass. You might want to play it a couple times, it’s amazing to see the massive amount of recoil this thing has shove the Railroad tie back like it weighed nothing.

I just took a few photos of the aftermath to show how everything ended up and to give an idea of how far back it shoved it.


One hole in Two hole out.

And the recovered balls after hitting the steel plate ended up mushrooming out to about 2” in diameter.


Colin
 
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