The Mighty 2 Bore Boxlock M/Ler

BelchFire

I speak fluent Vise-Grip
Admin
You........are.........the.........MAN!

Not one,

Not two,

But THREE SHOTS, people!

Stolzer must be German for "Heap wampum testosterone". I can't imagine doing that. And you made it look mild too. Flinch?
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
WOW!So how many foot pounds will that ball deliver?
I didn't run it across my chrono, so I have no idea what the real numbers are, but I know that from pluggin guesstimates into the calculators over at beartooth ballistics, it make the 600NE look mild.

Colin
 

myfriendis410

Well-known member
Very cool. What kind of functional accuracy can you expect? No way are you going to be able to bench rest that baby.
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
I would think that if a guy really spent the time refining the load, and working with the gun, you could probably shoot cloverleafs with ti at 50 yards. But given the size of the kill zones on Elephants, any kind of reasonable accuracy would do the job. No it strictly an off-hand shooter, you have to be able to roll with it or it would probably cause some serious bodily harm.

Colin
 

BelchFire

I speak fluent Vise-Grip
Admin
I would think that if a guy really spent the time refining the load, and working with the gun, you could probably shoot cloverleafs with ti at 50 yards. But given the size of the kill zones on Elephants, any kind of reasonable accuracy would do the job. No it strictly an off-hand shooter, you have to be able to roll with it or it would probably cause some serious bodily harm.

Colin
Notice he said "a guy" and not I. :lol bashing sign: (he didn't say Belch either, fortunately)

Given the size of the ball, I sure hope you could cloverleaf it! That's like saying you could cloverleaf dinner plates.

Man, I'm LOVING this thread. :smiley-mouse:
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
This is my first attempt at case making, I need to be honest here and say that case building is clearly a skilled form that is well worth the money spent on a professional case maker. This was quite possibly one of the hardest parts of this build. Fitting and lining even this little accoutrements box took me several frustrating days to do, and the results are clearly not as nicely done as a professional case builder would be able to do. So my hats off to them, they certainly have my respect for their talents.

The Front:


The Back:


The Inside:


The Box was built from Walnut, Claro for the top and bottom, and Black for the sides. All the hardware is brass. It has a similar finish to the rifle.

I haven't decided how I am going to case the rifle yet, I'm having difficulty finding walnut of the sizes I need. White Oak is an option, but I'm not sure that is the way I want to go yet. I have also considered buying an Aluminum Flight case, and then lining it with a fitted liner.

Colin
 

BelchFire

I speak fluent Vise-Grip
Admin
Very nice work on the case. I don't see a thing wrong with it. F'real.

I know you're the expert and you don't come here for advice, but aluminum seems out of place with this gun. You've gone to great extremes to make this rifle period appropriate. I'd hate to see you lose all that hard work and appropriate image at the last minute.

But I certainly wouldn't pass it up if it was in an aluminum case. Either way, the rifle is beautiful. Just mind boggling all the way around.
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
Thank you, Belchfire.

I'm agree aluminum is out of place with the rest of the build. There's some pro's and con's no matter what I do. If I go with aluminum it won't match the rest of the build, but it also means traveling with it to a Safari would be made fairly simple. A wood case would look like the rest of the build, but it would also mean double casing it to protect it for travel, and since the rifle weighs 24 pounds, then add the weight of a wood case, and then on top of that add a travel case..... you'd need a forklift to get it to the check in counter at the airport. I don't know what I'm going to do....I'll figure something out though.

Colin
 

myfriendis410

Well-known member
I used to make cigar humidors for a living out of solid exotics. Highly polished, kitted out and priced in the $1k up range. Produced 200 per month during the boom. (my pedigree)

Some advice for a wooden case: First, due to the large surface area, do not use solid wood. Cabinet grade plywood would be a better choice for structural integrity and stability (no warping). You can add a stiffener to the inside faces with sheet aluminum to protect from punching through if desired. The carcase should be thick solid wood to support all of the furniture and you can embed the plywood in the box to finish the edges. I built one for my double shotgun and chose oak plywood for the front/back and the carcase was constructed from 3/4" Bubinga which is incredibly tough. Walnut would not be my first choice due to it's softer structure and it does crush easily. The interior fitting is just a matter of being meticulous, a skill you already have in droves. An outer case can be made from heavy duty nylon with a zipper, to protect it from gouges and dings.

Really, I found it amusing that you are daunted by building a case after seeing the stuff you're used to doing. Truly outstanding work and you should be justifiably proud.
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
Thank you.
The box itself didn't bother me, what was so frustrating was all the individual pieces that went into the lining, and trying to get every seam to blend in and look like it was one piece. Each one of those cavities has 6 or more individual pieces of material in them. I've never worked with fabric and had no idea what a pain it was to make it all lay down smooth and seamless.

I think I am going to end up going with White Oak, mostly because it is what I am able to get locally. I priced walnut from a couple of suppliers and it would all have to be shipped to me, and was extremely expensive in dimensional lumber. I wanted the walnut because a lot of traditional case were made from it,and it would all be a matched set that way, but getting it in big enough sizes now days is nearly impossible. Thanks for the tips on the plywood, I'll have to talk to my lumber yard and see if they have any in stock or if it will have to be ordered.

Colin
 

myfriendis410

Well-known member
Oak should be no problem at all and I would be surprised if they don't already have it in stock. The oak is a good choice as it has a much higher crush strength than walnut.

When I finished out my interior, I used a combination of 3M spray adhesive, hot glue and a clothes iron, and a brad nailer. You're right: a lot of little pieces to deal with. I used some kind of green satin from Wally World and it turned out terrific. Every time I open it up at the gun club guys ask me to build them one. NO!!!!
 

CowboyCS

Well-known member
The rifle case is finally finished and this is now a completed set. All I'm lacking is the handle for the center of the case, I just haven't found what I am looking for yet. There are brass handles on each end of the case though, so it is easy enough to pick up and move around.

The Final details:
2 Bore
24" Smoothbore barrel
Weight 24 pounds
Full Top rib with integrated quarter rib and front ramp.
Full under rib with pipes and sling stud.
Black Walnut Stock with ebony tip.
Oil Finished.
Single leaf English express sights.
Rust Blued, with moderate coverage engraving.
16 LPI Semi-Flattop Checkering.
Both the rifle case and the accoutrements case are walnut, with a similar finish to the rifle.











I hope you enjoyed this build.

Colin
 

trapperbr549

Well-known member
I have really enjoyed following this thread. Thanks for taking the time to post all of it. And by the way, great piece of art you created there.
 

castor

Inactive
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