Third Wisconsin summer CWD hunt begins

spectr17

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WI - State launches third summer hunt to combat CWD

8/12/02

BARNEVELD, Wis. (AP) - Ross Noak and Scott Klinger are on a mission. Shoot deer. Shoot lots of deer.

Noak and Klinger drove 300 miles from New Richmond, near the Minnesota border, to southwest Wisconsin to take part in the state's third special summertime deer hunt to stop chronic wasting disease.

"We don't want it to spread to our neck of the woods," Noak said Saturday as he and Klinger unloaded a doe and three fawns at a state Department of Natural Resources checkpoint in the rolling countryside just outside Barneveld.

The weeklong hunt is part of the DNR's plan to stop the deadly brain disease by killing all the estimated 25,000 deer in a 374-square-mile area of Dane, Iowa and Sauk counties. Twenty-four deer in the area have tested positive for the disease, the first time it had been detected east of the Mississippi River.

Experts say there is no evidence the disease can infect humans, but the World Health Organization has said people shouldn't eat any part of a deer with signs of the disease.

DNR officials hope wiping out the southwestern herd will preserve Wisconsin's rich deer-hunting heritage in the rest of the state. The sport annually attracts 700,000 hunters who spend nearly $9 million on the sport a year, according to a 1996 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service survey.

"To do nothing is just not an alternative," DNR spokesman Greg Matthews said. "The alternative is the Wisconsin deer herd crashes."

Most of the deer in the eradication zone are expected to be killed during the regular fall hunting season, but DNR officials scheduled four summer hunts to get a jump on wiping out the herd and obtaining tissue samples to test for the disease.

State workers at the Barneveld checkpoint spent a bloody day sawing off deer's heads and preparing them for shipment to a lab in Ames, Iowa, where the brains will be tested for infection.

The DNR plans to notify hunters who choose to keep their carcasses whether their deer tested positive for CWD within a month and a half, Matthews said.

It's been slow going during the summer hunts. Hunters and government sharpshooters killed only 601 deer in hunts in June and July. Hunters turned in only 19 deer Saturday, Matthews. Three or four decided to keep their carcasses, he said.

Warm weather, insects and dense summer foliage make things tough in the woods, hunters said.

"It's jungle warfare," said Carl Batha, DNR operations chief for the summer hunts.

Wisconsin's deer hunting seasons have traditionally run in the late fall, when trees are bare and snow makes tracking easier. Hunters at the Barneveld checkpoint looked oddly out of place Saturday as they sweated in blaze-orange T-shirts against a lush green countryside.

Brad Welling of Madison said hunting in summer felt strange _ until he saw an eight-point buck move through an opening in the brush about six miles from the Barneveld checkpoint.

He dropped it with a textbook shot directly behind the shoulders from 50 yards.

"A surgeon couldn't kill that animal any quicker or cleaner," Welling said, laughing.

DNR officials gave Welling a permit to keep the deer's antlers, which were covered with a velvety-fuzz. For more than 100 years, Matthews said taking a velvet rack was evidence of hunting out of season. The fuzz appears as bucks grow out their antlers each summer but they rub it off before hunting begins.

But DNR officials said hunters this time out could keep velvet racks as a rare trophy as an incentive to draw them into the woods.

Batha said the summer hunts are a tune up for the real hunting season, when DNR officials plan to test anywhere from 40,000 to 50,000 tissues samples at more than 200 checkpoints around the state.

Batha said wildlife officials in western states where chronic wasting disease originated are amazed at the immensity of Wisconsin's testing plan. Hunters in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska don't harvest as many deer as Wisconsin officials plan to test, Batha said.

"They're applauding us for being as aggressive as we are," Batha said.

Noak and Klinger said they've killed 10 deer in the June and July hunts, and they don't plan to stop now.

After turning in their fawns and doe, they climbed back into Noak's massive cherry-red Ford F-250 pickup truck and headed back into the woods. The hunt was on again.

"They want us to kill everything," Noak said. "That's what we're doing."

___

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources: http://www.dnr.state.wi.us
 

spectr17

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WI - State launches third summer hunt to combat CWD

8/12/02

BARNEVELD, Wis. (AP) - Ross Noak and Scott Klinger are on a mission. Shoot deer. Shoot lots of deer.

Noak and Klinger drove 300 miles from New Richmond, near the Minnesota border, to southwest Wisconsin to take part in the state's third special summertime deer hunt to stop chronic wasting disease.

"We don't want it to spread to our neck of the woods," Noak said Saturday as he and Klinger unloaded a doe and three fawns at a state Department of Natural Resources checkpoint in the rolling countryside just outside Barneveld.

The weeklong hunt is part of the DNR's plan to stop the deadly brain disease by killing all the estimated 25,000 deer in a 374-square-mile area of Dane, Iowa and Sauk counties. Twenty-four deer in the area have tested positive for the disease, the first time it had been detected east of the Mississippi River.

Experts say there is no evidence the disease can infect humans, but the World Health Organization has said people shouldn't eat any part of a deer with signs of the disease.

DNR officials hope wiping out the southwestern herd will preserve Wisconsin's rich deer-hunting heritage in the rest of the state. The sport annually attracts 700,000 hunters who spend nearly $9 million on the sport a year, according to a 1996 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service survey.

"To do nothing is just not an alternative," DNR spokesman Greg Matthews said. "The alternative is the Wisconsin deer herd crashes."

Most of the deer in the eradication zone are expected to be killed during the regular fall hunting season, but DNR officials scheduled four summer hunts to get a jump on wiping out the herd and obtaining tissue samples to test for the disease.

State workers at the Barneveld checkpoint spent a bloody day sawing off deer's heads and preparing them for shipment to a lab in Ames, Iowa, where the brains will be tested for infection.

The DNR plans to notify hunters who choose to keep their carcasses whether their deer tested positive for CWD within a month and a half, Matthews said.

It's been slow going during the summer hunts. Hunters and government sharpshooters killed only 601 deer in hunts in June and July. Hunters turned in only 19 deer Saturday, Matthews. Three or four decided to keep their carcasses, he said.

Warm weather, insects and dense summer foliage make things tough in the woods, hunters said.

"It's jungle warfare," said Carl Batha, DNR operations chief for the summer hunts.

Wisconsin's deer hunting seasons have traditionally run in the late fall, when trees are bare and snow makes tracking easier. Hunters at the Barneveld checkpoint looked oddly out of place Saturday as they sweated in blaze-orange T-shirts against a lush green countryside.

Brad Welling of Madison said hunting in summer felt strange _ until he saw an eight-point buck move through an opening in the brush about six miles from the Barneveld checkpoint.

He dropped it with a textbook shot directly behind the shoulders from 50 yards.

"A surgeon couldn't kill that animal any quicker or cleaner," Welling said, laughing.

DNR officials gave Welling a permit to keep the deer's antlers, which were covered with a velvety-fuzz. For more than 100 years, Matthews said taking a velvet rack was evidence of hunting out of season. The fuzz appears as bucks grow out their antlers each summer but they rub it off before hunting begins.

But DNR officials said hunters this time out could keep velvet racks as a rare trophy as an incentive to draw them into the woods.

Batha said the summer hunts are a tune up for the real hunting season, when DNR officials plan to test anywhere from 40,000 to 50,000 tissues samples at more than 200 checkpoints around the state.

Batha said wildlife officials in western states where chronic wasting disease originated are amazed at the immensity of Wisconsin's testing plan. Hunters in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska don't harvest as many deer as Wisconsin officials plan to test, Batha said.

"They're applauding us for being as aggressive as we are," Batha said.

Noak and Klinger said they've killed 10 deer in the June and July hunts, and they don't plan to stop now.

After turning in their fawns and doe, they climbed back into Noak's massive cherry-red Ford F-250 pickup truck and headed back into the woods. The hunt was on again.

"They want us to kill everything," Noak said. "That's what we're doing."

___

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources: http://www.dnr.state.wi.us
 

Passthru

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In my oppinion that it the only way to stop CWD from spreading so far,what my concern is that deer will start moving into this area in a year or so and catch the disease because it is still there waiting for a host,kinda like Parvo does with dogs.then the process starts all over agian.but the thinner the herd the harder it is to spread,less deer to deer contact.
 

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