Traditional Archery Book

betelgeuse

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I have been thinking of buying a longbow. Does anyone have suggestions on a book that offers a good overview of the subject. I know most sports have what is considered a "Bible"

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
 



Grey Taylor

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None that I've ever seen.
The market is so broad, changes so fast, and is so subjective that I don't know if a book would really be helpful. Things like hand shock are pretty variable. A friend may have a bow that rattles his teeth but when I shoot it it's smooth as a baby fur seal's butt.
For instance, I have a Pete George longbow. Great Hill style bow, good shooter, but the handle is a wee bit too big for my hands so it's not the best bow for me. Little bigger hands and this would be a great bow.
I'd suggest going to trad shoots in your area and test shoot bows that vendors have or even bows that guys are carrying around. All the trad people I know would be happy to let you shoot their bow. The only exception would be self bows. You need to know about self bows to shoot them with no problems. For instance, I've heard a few times of wheely shooters that want to try a self bow. The unsuspecting owner hands it over and the wheely shooter (who doesn't know any better) gives a mighty yank to get past the let-off that he's used to and the bow breaks. Or, let's say I've got a wood bow tillered for my 25" draw and someone draws it to their 29" draw... could easily be a problem.

Guy
 

betelgeuse

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Thanks Guy any input is helpful. I am goint to look and see if there are any local shoots.

I did locate a book on tradbow.com called the traditional bowhunters handbook by TJ Conrads.
Maybe I will order that.
 

betelgeuse

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BBH, thanks for the link, looks like a lot of info there. I think I will order the Conrad book an check it out.
 

spectr17

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We've got plenty of answers here from trad bow folks. We need to get this forum hopping again instead of sending folks somewhere else before they even have a chance here.
 

hoytrdye

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betelgeuse what questions are you looking for pertaining to longbows?
 

betelgeuse

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First off I was wondering what are the advantages and disadvantages of a longbow vs a recurve.

Is it just preference or are there performance differences.

I was eyeing the Bear Montana that has been mentioned in previous posts.

I notice PSE also makes an affordable longbow, but Bear seems like a more trusted name.

Any advice is welcomed and appreciated
 

spectr17

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A longbow is just that, longer, so it's doesn't fit my gun case for flying. I leave one in MO so I can hunt there with it. I guess you could pay for oversize luggage to fly with one.

Recurves are shorter, you can even get a take down recurve for easier travel.

To me it's just what I feel like hunting with that day. Sometimes I want to carry the recurve and sometimes the longbow. I enjoy shooting both so it's not a matter of favorite bow really.

That make any sense?


On the Bear Montana, we sold a bunch thru the store here. Real nice bow. We have 2 AIM Samick Vipers left in 50# and 55#. They are a entry level longbow, little cheaper than the Montana at $179 and $169 respectively.
 

Grey Taylor

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I guess I'll throw my $.27 worth here...

I like both recurves and longbows, but I enjoy shooting the longbow better. I find it to be more fun and more... "bowish" if that makes any sense.
For just starting out, or for switching from training wheels to a trad bow, recurves may be easier due to the handle shape and shelf construction. But there are a lot of longbows that have locator type grips and easy to use designs. In a really general manner, recurves are faster than longbows. But when you get into better designed longbows, that difference disappears pretty quick. Personally, I don't worry about speed a whole lot. If a slower bow shoots better for me than a fast bow, that slower one is what I'll go with. Accuracy over speed any day.
I've never shot the Bear Montana so I can't comment on that. A friend of mine who is very experienced really likes the Samick bows. They seem to be excellent values. For the price Jesse quotes, you can't hardly go wrong for that. If you get one and decide to upgrade down the road, you'll have an inexpensive bow for backup, fishing, or loaning to friends jealous of all the fun you're having.

Guy
 

betelgeuse

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Guys, thanks for the tips. Spectr, I didn't think about the traveling aspect but funny you should mention it.
One of the reasons I was looking into a bow is that I wanted to hunt the early season in Idaho at my parents.

Grey,
when you say "shelf construction" what are you referring to ? Is it the arrow rest area ? I notice the longbows seem like they don't have much of an arrow rest area. Not even sure if arrow rest is the proper term.


Hoyt, I am in Ventura Ca


I had a Ben Pearson Cougar in 50# and a Bear Kodiak in 45# when I was a teen. My gramps bought them at an estate sale. I gave them away when I moved out of my parents. That was 20 years ago. I shot a few rabbits and squirrels and shot and missed a buck once. I had no idea what I was doing but remember it was fun. I sure wish I would have held on to them, but then again I wish I still had my 68 firebird ! My cousin shoots a Matthews compound and thinks I am nuts for wanting a traditional bow. It just seems like it would be a lot less complicated to try traditional archery.

I am going to order that book and get familiar with the terminology and maybe I can answer a lot of my own questions. I am the type that does a lot of research when deciding what to buy something.

After I know a little I can ask some more pertinent questions.
 

Grey Taylor

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Yes, when I say shelf construction it's the arrow rest I'm talking about. Compounds and some trad bows have specific arrow rests that are fastened or attached to the bow. Simplest to do with a recurve is just shoot off the shelf. As you noted, some longbows have smaller shelfs. In the case of an all wood bow, there may be no shelf at all and you have to rest the arrow on your hand (not as difficult as it may sound).
For a beginning shooter a larger shelf may be easier to learn on but it doesn't take a lot to get used to a smaller style of shelf if that's what you end up with.

Guy
 


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