Travel Trailer advice needed

sean english

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Thinking of getting a trailer but know nothing about them. Have you had one? What things are to look for? I have a V6 Tacoma so dont want a big one and dont have a place to park the trailer.
I think we will rent one for a couple of days first and see how we like it. What are your thoughts? We are at the "Information Gathering" Stage.
 



Brnsvllyjohn

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I think you will get a lot of different opinions but here is mine.
My current trailer was purchased new in 2004. I tend to keep my RVs longer than most people. We compromised on size (21' 4500 lbs.) which means larger than I wanted but still small enough to be considered a lightweight trailer. I think a few things are important if you plan on keeping it for a few years.
Aluminum frame. They will all leak somewhere eventually and dealing with dry rot on a wooden frame is a pain.
I also prefer aluminum siding, it is easier and cheaper to repair than the fiberglass and the fiberglass tends to delaminate and no company will stand behind the siding for very long.
At least one good bed is a must. Sleeping on a sofa or a table you take down is a pain.
Depending on where you stay grey and black water storage can be an issue. I like a minimum of 35 gallons per tank. It is easer to add fresh water to your coach than dump waste water.
If I were buying one today I would downsize slightly because when they get too big you find yourself not taking them in some areas. If I did not camp and hunt in the snow a couple of times per year I would go back to a real lightweight with canvas tip outs on the ends. My first unit 40 years ago was a tent trailer and I took that thing everywhere.
I have owned RVs for 40 years and no RV is perfect but for us the travel trailer now makes more sense than a motorhome.
A couple of tips if you have not used an RV much. CONSERVE WATER. The largest RV I owned was a big fifth wheel. It had lots of water storage. I took a young couple with us on a fishing trip once and we ran out of water by noon the first day. No matter how much I told them to not leave the facet running they always did. With 35 gallon of fresh I can stay 10 days by myself without an issue and 5 to 6 days with my wife before I run out of fresh water, sometimes longer depending on where we stay. Think GI shower don't just stand in the shower letting run.
Conserve battery power by not leaving every light on. I carry a small generator but I hate running it.
Renting an RV may tell you a lot and is cheaper in the long run if you have to pay storage fees.
 

mischief209

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I drive a v6 tacoma and i pull a pop up trailer behind it. Hard to beat a pop up for hunting. There small enough to fit in most undeveloped camping spots. Mine is 16ft and pops out to 22ft. Lite enough i can unhitch and move around myself if you were to get into a spot you cant turnaround or maneuver with the truck. You have no idea its back there when pulling. You can get them equipped with shower and toliet if needed. Anywhere from 3 to 5k will get you a nice used 1.
 

Aught-SixGuy

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You could go the route I went. I bought a 7x16 cargo trailer and am converting it to a stealth camper. Much cheaper and a bit lighter, plus it can be a dual purpose unit. I don't have to worry about dumping gray/black water, I just carry enough culinary water to survive the hunt/camping trip and make use of the "facilities" nature provides (unless I'm in an improved campground). Plus it saves from the extra stuff you have to buy, paying for winterizing, etc. And if it gets dirty or bloody, it's no big loss as the carpet is easily removed. Just my $.02 FWIW.
 

xbeefedgex

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At least one good bed is a must. Sleeping on a sofa or a table you take down is a pain.
Words to live by. When buying a trailer you constantly have to think what can you live without, a bed is one of those things.

We have a 2016 Outdoors RV Creekside 27BHS (now Timber ridge 27BHS model) and couldn't be happier with it. Bigger than what you want most likely, however it truly is the most versatile floor plan. Outdoors RV does make smaller and more lightweight TTs that may be closer to what you're looking for. They're more expensive, however they are also built to last. A true 4 season camper.

With that being said, my Dad has a 2013 Forest River Flagstaff ultra light, about 22 feet overall with no slideouts that he tows with a 2002 V6 Tacoma. He's had it out 3 times, and its been nothing but electrical issues. He 'upgraded' from a 2001ish pop up Forest river, about this floor plan with a single slide out dinette. Only issue he ever had with it was the slide out broke a water line. When he traded it in for the 2013, they gave him something like 8k for it, so there is definitely a large market for them.

If we didn't have the room, or the necessity for a bigger camper, we would have gone with a pop up that met our needs. If you plan on staying at actual campgrounds that have bathrooms, you'll probably never use it in the trailer. Anyone else that posts in this thread will agree how much of a pain in the ass it is to set up your black hose/flushing the lines, etc. when you're only staying for the weekend.

And then there is your truck. Just because it can tow up to 6800lbs, gear and people included, doesn't mean it can stop 6800lbs. Keep in mind most trailer weights will be listed as dry, and you should have a quality brake controller installed.

If you haven't camped in a travel trailer/RV before, highly suggest renting one before you buy.
 

Frank X. Morris

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Howdy Sean,
Moby 1 Expedition trailers. Even if you don't get one you can get some ideas.
 

JohnFP

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Not a lot I can add to what was already said. If you buy used check the propane tanks, some may be empty or damn near empty and when you go for a refill they are out of date. This will cause you some additional money plus a wait for the inspection.

I would suggest a used pop-up as your first.
 

sean english

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Thank you all. Pop up doesnt have a hard roof so if its windy, you get the wind. Also, for my wife, it must have bathroom and shower. Even for me. You take a shower after chasing chukar all day, and you are a new person for second day of stupidity. Again, thanks to all. I am now looking at quads. Clueless about them as well.
 

Brnsvllyjohn

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I have owned 3 Hondas and one Polaris. I currently have a Honda and the Polaris. I have used Yamaha and Can Am also. It depends on what you expect it to do but it is a Ford verses Chevy argument. For my money Honda always starts and will get you there and back no matter what. That is why I still own my Honda. Polaris is the best ride I could find and the Honda was beating me to death in rough country. All I expect a quad to do is get me there and back. Don't care how fast it will go or how big it is. 4 wheel drive is a must for me since I have to crawl over rocks a lot. I purchased the smallest engine displacement that was available in 4 wheel drive at the time. My Honda is a 2005 350 Rancher and my Polaris is a 2016 570 Touring 2 up. I can ride the Polaris without a lot of discomfort and can legally take a passenger in Ca. The ride is amazing compared to other quads I have been on. They are about the same for climbing in rough terrain. The Polaris is way heavier so I am going to have to go to a larger truck soon. I don't ride just to ride but to get me places my pickup can't go but always on legal road systems. I hunt alone a lot so it also allows me to do one way hunts by leaving a truck some where and hunting back to it after parking the quad at another location.
I prefer a typical transmission over the V belt drive but Polaris has the belt drive. I hate that part but it is what I ride now.
 

OPAH

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Save your money earn your interest and rent one when you need one.
A) your earn interest not pay it
B) not storage cost or getting things stolen
C) No care or up keep, no covers or having to hide the wheels?

To me it is more advantageous to have choice of models for different adventures, every year.
 

Farallon

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Save your money earn your interest and rent one when you need one.
A) your earn interest not pay it
B) not storage cost or getting things stolen
C) No care or up keep, no covers or having to hide the wheels?

To me it is more advantageous to have choice of models for different adventures, every year.
I agree. But, there are a lot of things we do that "don't pencil out".
 

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