Undercover Investigation Nabs Dozens Of MO Deer Poachers

spectr17

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Undercover Investigation Nabs Dozens Of Deer Poachers

http://www.dto.com

Fines top $32,000 and are still climbing.

More than 40 poachers have been fined in excess of $32,000, and others await justice following an undercover investigation in three Ozarks counties.

Responding to citizens' complaints about flagrant deer poaching, the Missouri Department of Conservation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted a joint special investigation in Iron, Reynolds, Ripley, and Shannon counties. The investigation, which spanned the 1998 and 1999 firearms deer seasons, identified and documented the activities of groups of hunters who were taking deer illegally on both private and public land. Now, with most of the cases resolved, the two agencies have released details of the operation.

At the center of the joint investigation was the practice of hunting deer with hounds. This illegal method of hunting usually involves a number of hunters scattered over a large area. Participants use two-way radios to stay in contact with others in their party. The sound of the hounds in pursuit of the deer allows the hunters to judge where the deer may run, and the deer doggers use cars, trucks or all-terrain vehicles to intercept and kill deer fleeing from the hounds. The intercept points often are public roads or streams.

The deer dogging technique is most effective in rugged landscapes, where hills, ridges and valleys funnel fleeing deer along predictable routes.

An undercover investigator infiltrated groups of hunters that were hunting deer with the aid of dogs. The investigator used specialized video surveillance cameras to document violations, as support staff monitored and recorded radio conversations from unmarked vehicles near the illegal activity. Conservation officers and federal agents documented 251 violations of state law and 384 federal violations. Most involved hunting deer with the aid of dogs, but violations also included taking over the legal limit of deer, failing to tag and check deer and taking deer from a public roadway. Many of these incidents took place on U.S. Forest Service or U.S. Army Corps of Engineers property.

To date, more than 40 violators have received fines totaling more than $32,000 in United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri at Cape Girardeau. Six other hunters still face charges in federal court and five face charges in state court. Fines for these offenses range from $500 to $1,000 per charge.

Bob White, Protection Unit Chief for the Conservation Department, said the agency strongly supports the legal use of sporting dogs, but pursuing deer with the aid of dogs is prohibited. "Hunting rabbits, squirrels, quail, waterfowl and furbearers are examples of the legal, ethical use of dogs for hunting." said White. "Pursuing deer with dogs often causes conflict with those who still-hunt, as dogs chasing deer interrupt legal hunters, and also cause trespass complaints on private property."

White said the prohibition of dogs in deer hunting is strongly supported by hunters. A 1991 survey of Missouri hunters showed that 71.6 percent said free-running dogs were either a great threat or somewhat of a threat to deer hunting.

"This case is a warning to renegade groups of hunters who operate with no regard for wildlife regulations or respect for the rights of Missouri landowners and sportsmen," said White. "We intend to make them answer for their actions. The Conservation Department will continue working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop new and innovative investigative techniques to address deer-dogging and other illegal hunting."

End Article

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Here's a list of the ones who have been convicted and fined.
Source is the River Hills Traveler, May 2002 issue.

==================================================

A number of people have asked that Traveler carry a list of those arrested in connection with a federal undercover investigation into illegal hunting in a few Ozark counties. The arrests made news far and wide, but few publications carried a list of who was involved.

Charges filed were federal, mostly related to hunting deer with dogs on national forest, parkland or Corps of Engineers lands.

Following is a list of 41 people who have paid fines ranging from $50 to $2000. This list, furnished by the Missouri Conservation Department, says 57 individuals were charged. Those whose cases are still pending are not identified.

George Becker, $500; Gary Barton, $500; Tim Buckner, $2000, Randy Preslar, $1000; Tim Deason, $1000: David Garner, $1000.

Doug Murdock, $ 1000; Johnnie Miller, $1500; John McNail, $1000; Bill Buckner, $1500; Larry Barnes, $500; Nick Barton, $500; James Bonney, $500.

Marvin Brawley, $500; Charles Campbell, $500; John Cook, $500; Rexall Dunn, $500; Eric Dunn, $500; Robert Baker, $500; Mike Harper, $500; Doug Hawkins, $500; Stan Hawkins, $500; Terry Hawkins, $500.

David Jackson, $500; William Lindsay, $500; Denny Mathes, $ 100 paid for $500 fine; Jay Mathes, $50 paid for $500 fine; Austin Schoue, $500; William Schoue, $500; James Shy, $500; Nova Smith, $500.

Gabe Gray, $200 paid for $500 fine; Charles Hasty, $500; Russ Pilkinton, $500; Gurney Radford, $500; Alan Hunter, $500; Mike Buckner, $375 paid for $1500 fine; Ed Buckner, $1000; Roger Hickman, $250 paid for $500 fine; Rene and Dennis Wagner, $500 paid for $2500 fine.

41 of 57 subjects have paid $24,475 as of 2/1/01.
 



spectr17

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Undercover Investigation Nabs Dozens Of Deer Poachers

http://www.dto.com

Fines top $32,000 and are still climbing.

More than 40 poachers have been fined in excess of $32,000, and others await justice following an undercover investigation in three Ozarks counties.

Responding to citizens' complaints about flagrant deer poaching, the Missouri Department of Conservation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted a joint special investigation in Iron, Reynolds, Ripley, and Shannon counties. The investigation, which spanned the 1998 and 1999 firearms deer seasons, identified and documented the activities of groups of hunters who were taking deer illegally on both private and public land. Now, with most of the cases resolved, the two agencies have released details of the operation.

At the center of the joint investigation was the practice of hunting deer with hounds. This illegal method of hunting usually involves a number of hunters scattered over a large area. Participants use two-way radios to stay in contact with others in their party. The sound of the hounds in pursuit of the deer allows the hunters to judge where the deer may run, and the deer doggers use cars, trucks or all-terrain vehicles to intercept and kill deer fleeing from the hounds. The intercept points often are public roads or streams.

The deer dogging technique is most effective in rugged landscapes, where hills, ridges and valleys funnel fleeing deer along predictable routes.

An undercover investigator infiltrated groups of hunters that were hunting deer with the aid of dogs. The investigator used specialized video surveillance cameras to document violations, as support staff monitored and recorded radio conversations from unmarked vehicles near the illegal activity. Conservation officers and federal agents documented 251 violations of state law and 384 federal violations. Most involved hunting deer with the aid of dogs, but violations also included taking over the legal limit of deer, failing to tag and check deer and taking deer from a public roadway. Many of these incidents took place on U.S. Forest Service or U.S. Army Corps of Engineers property.

To date, more than 40 violators have received fines totaling more than $32,000 in United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri at Cape Girardeau. Six other hunters still face charges in federal court and five face charges in state court. Fines for these offenses range from $500 to $1,000 per charge.

Bob White, Protection Unit Chief for the Conservation Department, said the agency strongly supports the legal use of sporting dogs, but pursuing deer with the aid of dogs is prohibited. "Hunting rabbits, squirrels, quail, waterfowl and furbearers are examples of the legal, ethical use of dogs for hunting." said White. "Pursuing deer with dogs often causes conflict with those who still-hunt, as dogs chasing deer interrupt legal hunters, and also cause trespass complaints on private property."

White said the prohibition of dogs in deer hunting is strongly supported by hunters. A 1991 survey of Missouri hunters showed that 71.6 percent said free-running dogs were either a great threat or somewhat of a threat to deer hunting.

"This case is a warning to renegade groups of hunters who operate with no regard for wildlife regulations or respect for the rights of Missouri landowners and sportsmen," said White. "We intend to make them answer for their actions. The Conservation Department will continue working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop new and innovative investigative techniques to address deer-dogging and other illegal hunting."

End Article

==============================================================


Here's a list of the ones who have been convicted and fined.
Source is the River Hills Traveler, May 2002 issue.

==================================================

A number of people have asked that Traveler carry a list of those arrested in connection with a federal undercover investigation into illegal hunting in a few Ozark counties. The arrests made news far and wide, but few publications carried a list of who was involved.

Charges filed were federal, mostly related to hunting deer with dogs on national forest, parkland or Corps of Engineers lands.

Following is a list of 41 people who have paid fines ranging from $50 to $2000. This list, furnished by the Missouri Conservation Department, says 57 individuals were charged. Those whose cases are still pending are not identified.

George Becker, $500; Gary Barton, $500; Tim Buckner, $2000, Randy Preslar, $1000; Tim Deason, $1000: David Garner, $1000.

Doug Murdock, $ 1000; Johnnie Miller, $1500; John McNail, $1000; Bill Buckner, $1500; Larry Barnes, $500; Nick Barton, $500; James Bonney, $500.

Marvin Brawley, $500; Charles Campbell, $500; John Cook, $500; Rexall Dunn, $500; Eric Dunn, $500; Robert Baker, $500; Mike Harper, $500; Doug Hawkins, $500; Stan Hawkins, $500; Terry Hawkins, $500.

David Jackson, $500; William Lindsay, $500; Denny Mathes, $ 100 paid for $500 fine; Jay Mathes, $50 paid for $500 fine; Austin Schoue, $500; William Schoue, $500; James Shy, $500; Nova Smith, $500.

Gabe Gray, $200 paid for $500 fine; Charles Hasty, $500; Russ Pilkinton, $500; Gurney Radford, $500; Alan Hunter, $500; Mike Buckner, $375 paid for $1500 fine; Ed Buckner, $1000; Roger Hickman, $250 paid for $500 fine; Rene and Dennis Wagner, $500 paid for $2500 fine.

41 of 57 subjects have paid $24,475 as of 2/1/01.
 


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