Walking in the rain

Bankrunner

Well-known member
Got back yesterday from a couple day trip up into the foothills. It rained almost the whole time but in between choirs I did get out for a shed hunting walk to test out my new Columbia WeatherEdge rain jacket. The jacket lists for $100 but was bought on sale for $50. It performed well on a 2 1/2 hr hike and it rained pretty hard the whole time. I'm not sold just yet because other breathable jackets Iv'e used soak up the rain after time.
So here's a rain gear tip that works well for me. Take a pair of old leaky waders and cut off the boots to make yourself a pair of rainproof bib overalls. Combine your new bibs with a pair of muck boots or la cross rubber boots and you are 100% dry from the belly down. If you use the high top rubber boots you can cut the waders off mid calf, if you use low top boots you'd want to cut them off low around the ankles. My waders are/were cabelas first flight dry plus so they are very light, especially with the boots cut off. Neoprene would also work, you'd just have to deal with a little extra weight and maybe some sweating issues, but if your walking slow or sitting in a blind they might be good in cold weather. I've got old neoprene waders, just haven't tried em yet. One side note, you'll probably want to wash the sink out if your going to use em for hunting, it's petty easy once the boots are cut off.
Didn't find any sheds but did see three deer, some ducks, a grey squirrel, and a bunch of quail.
 

dthome

Well-known member
Good tips!
I've had the same experience with breathable jackets. The durable water repellent (silicone spray) on the outside of the jacket wears off over time, and then you are left with the waterproof membrane underneath the outer fabric. When the outer fabric is saturated, I think it's hard for the membrane to keep the water from seeping in. That's my theory, anyway.
 

Bankrunner

Well-known member

Limited Out

Well-known member
I have an old set of Patagonia foul weather gear (Gortex) jacket and bibs, that just don't leak. They are a pleasure to hike in the rain with. My Filson Outfitter jacket is a soggy mess in the same conditions. Maybe that older Gortex is better I don't know. Hiking in the rain is one of life's pleasures in enjoy.
 

Farallon

Well-known member
There are products to treat gore Tex jackets. I have used them and they work. First wash the jacket in sport wash, then use revivex.
 

Bankrunner

Well-known member
That last walk was cool the quail and other birds didn't mind the rain one bit, they actually seems to be enjoying it while actively feeding on the ground. Also cool because no one else in in the woods.
Hey Farallon, what would be your best guestimate for how long the revivex lasts before you have to wash and reapply? I've tried some of the silicone sprays and they gave up after one rainy day in the duck blind. I didn't wash first though, don't remember that being in the directions like it is in the revivex directions.
 

Farallon

Well-known member
It lasted years, maybe more then 5. The last week or so, I have been wearing a jacket last treated about 10 years ago, but has been in the car, just in case it rained and I didn’t bring a rain coat. Water beaded up just like new. Very pleased with a former bicycle riding jacket that is about 20 years old.

IIRC, wash the jacket in sport wash, spray revivex, dry in dryer.
 

Limited Out

Well-known member
What types of material have you successfully used the Nikwax on? I would like to find a product that works well on a canvas Filson jacket?
 

muskeg

Well-known member
Back in the day I wore Ten pants & Jackets a lot while logging. I remember just spraying it down, ever so often, with any kind of silicone spry we had at the time. I'm sure the Filson wax will work.

Rubber rainwear like Helli Hansen, Guy Cotton and Grundens are the only really waterproof stuff there is. There are lots of various weights to choose from. But when you have to get physical you will get wet from inside from being sealed up.

Lots of different kinds of products available these days. Lots perform very well.
 

Bankrunner

Well-known member
Hmmm, I wonder if an old logger from the Oregon coast knows anything about rain gear.
A light weight rubber/pvc jacket with a merino wool sweeter underneath sounds cozy if your going for a walk in the pouring down rain.
 

Limited Out

Well-known member
That stuff looks incredibly. I would have liked to have applied it to my wall tent when I first got it, a least to the roof. Kind of pricey for that application, I one night in a wet sleeping bag might offset the cost, if you forgot to put the rain fly on. I am sure it would protect the tent from the pitch and dirt that gets all over it. It might even repel the misses from getting all over my back!
 

Brnsvllyjohn

Well-known member
I have tried a lot of rain gear and my son reconditions his Gortex every year. I am still not a huge fan of the lightweight Gortex type gear. I use it if I don't think it is going to rain day after day. If I think it is going to be ugly for a long period of time I have 2 jackets that I use. One is a Hodgman 3/4 length parka and the other one is a heavy pvc jacket that is much shorter. The Hodgman I purchased for an elk hunt in 1993. It is still my favorite for hunting. This last deer season I wore a pair of bibs from Cabelas that cost around $250 and they were OK. They got heavy but are not super noisy. Tough to get the blood and mud all off. The jacket I wore was from Rivers West. I prefer moving around and hiking in the Gortex type gear but it doesn't keep me as dry as the older rubberized stuff does. It just depends on what you are trying to do. I have 5-6 Gortex type products and I have been wet wearing all but the newest ones. The bibs wicked water up to my knees this past year but I was wearing good boots (Crispi) and wool socks with liners so I didn't feel cold. I only wore the Gortex stuff because it didn't rain all morning. However the brush was really wet. I would have been dryer with pvc pants and my Hodgman parka.
Decent pvc parkas cost $100 +- so way cheaper than high end rain gear. The problem is finding one light enough to hunt in and well made.
 
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TheGDog

Well-known member
When other fabric shell becomes drenched... you'll then get water seeping inward via the seams, where thread has poked thru the membrane shell. They are much better these days about sealing those seams. But even with the newer tech to do so, eventually over time that sealing will fail at some point.

Waterproof gloves exhibit that symptom the most, since they have so many seams and not a lot of surface area.

Gotta just be regular about touching it up with waterproofing spray-on's.
 

muskeg

Well-known member
I have used the Tech Wash products on all my gear ... GorTex; rubber rainwear; gloves; tents and tarps. Also the Tech Wash base garmet wash works well.

The main thing about Gortex re-waterproffing is after the non-detergetnt wash and then the water proofing wash ... low temp tumble dry for like 60 or 80 minutes.
 

Limited Out

Well-known member
Anybody try these hi-tech products on waders? I'm trying to talk myself into buying some of this stuff.
 
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Bankrunner

Well-known member
The cabela's first flight with dry plus have worked well for me, nothing gets through the fabric but like all waders they will get leaks with heavy use at the seams or around the rubber boot. I've only had one pair of waders last more than one season and a little bit ( that's hunting most every hunt day) and that was a pair of Hodgman neoprenes that i got on sale. They are a pleasure to hunt in because the breathables are so light but you'd want to add some long johns and fleece pants/pj bottoms underneath in cold weather.
 

Limited Out

Well-known member
I have been hitting the waders with that TV "Boat in a Can" with marginal success. I get a few more hunts out of a pair with that stuff if the holes aren't to big.
 


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