Walking on on deer hunters

rmorales

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While hunting this weekend, my son and I were chasing a cover of quail, when we came across a deer hunter who was set up, backed against some thick brush and out of view. Of course the quail flew into the wash were he was sitting and ran up the opposing side and along the wash floor. Upon seeing him we stopped, called back the dog and let the birds go without going after them. My question is would it have been wrong to keep going after them? I had just about stepped on the poor guy and from the look on his face I could see he wasn't to happy to see us, but we never knew he was anywhere near there.        
 

grtwythunter

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You did the right thing as far as I'm concerned. All hunters should act this way. I have had this happen to me many times...both ways. I will always back off when another hunter is in the area. I don't believe in possibly ruining someone elses hunt because they are in an area I want to be. I wish everyone else out there used the same courtesy. Be proud you're teaching your son the right thing!!       Scott
 

Speckmisser

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On behalf of (probably)most deer hunters, I thank you for that act of consideration.  Wish more people would see it as you did.  

I understand that public land is there for everyone, and there's no law against walking through a deer hunter's space, but common sense and consideration shouldn't have to be legislated.  There's plenty of land, and if someone is already set up hunting it, especially deer or pig hunting, then it shows a total lack of respect to hunt through.  I have had several quail hunters, other deer hunters, etc. walk right on past me...even after I stood and waved them off.  

Had one guy come up on me, offer a grin, then proceed to empty his gun on a covey out of the manzanitas less than 50 yards away.  This same guy went down the canyon a ways (maybe 500 yards) with his partner, then started picking apples off the trees, tossing them into the air, and trying to shoot them.  He must've gone through a box of shells.  I could've counted them, because he left them right there on the damned ground.  

So, RMorales, thank you and thank you again for setting a positive model for your son.
 

hronk

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rmorales:  I wish more were like you!  I have also been on both ends of that situation....  Thank you from all of us.....hronk
 

Thonzberry

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If there is a Hunter in the area I'll back off and stay out of the area. I've drove up to some areas and found a truck and have driven away from the area, becuase I think that alone can scare the game away even if you don't see the Hunter. Public land or private, if someone is in the spot before you move on. rmorales you set a good example for your son and anyone who reads this post Thank you
 

EVAN III

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 Good job! To bad there are'nt more like you. I will always back off and let the hunter be.  
 

tinner

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i was shooting saturday in santa clarita. i was the only person in the area as i could tell by there being no vehicles. about 1 1/2 hours into it i took a shot high over some cover(missed) then heard some yeling like i peppered or rainned on a fella. i yelled a sorry and tried to find the guy. i walked in the direction of the voice, calling to him. all i heard was what sounded like a cow bell. i tried to find this guy, if he was a hunter and had a dog i would have liked to put him on the birds to help me out. unfortunatly his good ethics were a loss for both of us. chalk that one up to murphy's law i guess  
 

East Coast

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I think the "back off" rule is universal for all sports.  In surfing there is a right of way based on how you are lined up.  When fishing, whether on the banks of a trout stream or trolling for salmon, you should always keep your distance.

It's all about common sense and courtesy which most of us learn as children.  The key to hunting is if you notice someone hunting big game, you need to realize that they need a lot of space.  Of course accidents happen and you may get in too close, but otherwise give them the space that they probably spent a good amount of time scouting and preparing to hunt.

EC
 


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