WHAT DID I DO WRONG?

Rimrock

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I went out this week to try my hand at varmint calling. Made four or five stands. On one I had a coyote bark and howl back at me from a brushy draw about 200 yards away. It answered several times from the same place for about 15 minutes. I was able to move downwind to within about 100 yards and called again. It never moved but would bark and howl. This lasted for about half an hour. Never did see it.
Some of you with experience may be able to shed some light on what I may have done wrong. Is it common for them to answer?

Play fair.
 

pitdog

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Rimrock,
I'm no expert but is it possible that you may have heard another varmint hunter? (could it have been songdog?)
Steve
 

grtwythunter

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Rimrock- What type of call were you using? If it was a howler it would be normal to hear them respond. If it was a distress(i.e. rabbit) call and they responded by barking and howling, you got busted somehow. My guess would be either they winded you or saw you come in. I have also noticed that in places that get hunted alot the yotes wise up pretty quick to distress calls.
   Keep at it....all it takes is practice and luck.
Scott
 

Frank

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Rimrock,

Rimrock,

I agree with Scott, you just got busted is all. Either saw or winded you. I had the exact same thing happen to me last October on a rabbit distress call, but suckered 2 other yotes on a mouse squeeker. godawful shooting kept me from nailing them both, but did get one of 'em.  Persistence, not giving up and perhaps going with someone with experience are the 2 biggest keys.  Good Hunting !    
 

Varmint Al

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The warning bark was evidence that the coyote knew that you were not a hurt rabbit or what ever call you were using. I assumed you answered back with a howler, but it is not clear in your text. Anyhow, I have had this happen a number of times. I switch to a howler and start talking to the coyote. I give him a challenge bark and every time he responds I give him another one or two. I also setup in his direction with my Bi-Fur-Pod rest so I am ready if I see any signs of hair between the trees or brush. Keep talking to him as long as you can. He might move to where you can get a shot. At least you know he is there. I don't think it is wise to move. You will have a better chance if you stay put and let him get curious.

While you have the coyote talking to you, something else is happening. Every coyote within a country mile will hear it and become interested. Many of them will not know what you are like the first coyote does. After about 15 to 20 minutes of this talking back and forth, switch to your rabbit call. The other coyotes that are listening just might come in and ignore the first coyote. This has happened to me.

If you don’t get a shot, at least you can work on your calling technique while talking to the coyote. When I come back with the challenge bark, they will in a few minutes, switch from the warning and start a half-hearted challenge bark back. Then you can match their sound. This is very good practice.



I have a section on my hunting page where I tell about a very similar experience using the challenge bark.

http://www.cctrap.com/~varmint/ahunt.htm#Coyote_Talk
 

songdog

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For me, 99.9999% of the time, when they start howling after I start calling (rabbit) that means I'm busted and they're letting the whole world know that I'm not a real rabbit.  Only once did I start to call, heard the howling (behind us about 100 yards) and actually get the coyote.  We could hear the coyote about every 30 seconds or so letting loose with a yip and a howl.  We listened to this for over 45 minutes while waiting for this coyote to come over a berm about 100 yards away.  Finally, it popped out... maybe out of curiosity more than anything.  But my friend put his lights out.  

Every other time has been a bust for me though once they get howling...

Scott makes a good point about coyotes getting wise to callers.  Normally, we just talk about the coyotes that we get but never the ones that we don't.  I can't prove it, but I think that it's a good idea to be as quiet on your way from a call as you were on the way to the call.  There have been several times where I haven't seen a thing on a stand only to stand up and have a coyote within 50 yards and I just didn't see him.  I'm sure that there are plenty that I don't see.  No sense in educating them any more than need be.

I had a friend who would call and if he didn't see anything, he'd pick a small rock out at 100-200 yards and take a single shot at it as "practice" figuring if he could hit that he could have hit a coyote at that same range.  I think that he actually educated a lot of coyotes that way.
 

Rimrock

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Thanks for your replies. I was using a distress call. It is possible that I was seen but am sure I wasn't smelled as I was downwind in a nice breeze. I will have to get me a howler I guess.  

Varmint Al, I have looked your page over several times. Really appreciate it.

Wingman, Is Songdog that mysterious fella that no one ever seems to see? If it was him, he sounded real good.

I hope I don't educate all the coyotes before I call one in. I might cause I'm gonna keep trying.

Play fair.
 

songdog

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I think it's about time I make an appearance... :wink-yellow:
 

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