where's the quail

Sky Buster

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went out quail hunting on saturday out by beaumont.  was a perfect day, and i found a perfect area.  there was alot of rolling hills with lots of cover, and a small stream flowing down a valley nearby.  i must have walked 6 miles in every direction.  didnt see or hear a single bird.  this was my first time out quail hunting....kind of a bummer.  has anyone been out by beaumont?  ive heard theres a descent amount of birds out there, but i sure couldnt find em.  if anyone has any tips or any info to help me out, i would really appreciate it.  
 



Bill W

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Sometimes they're hard to find. Once you do find an area with birds you will usually find them there year after year after year.  One thing difficult about hunting near a stream is that there is such a long area with water.  Sometimes it's easier to hunt the desert near an orchard or someother localized water source.  The birds tend to be more localized.  

Check out my thread on guzzler locations.  Apparenty Jim Mathews publishes a newsletter that sounds like an excellent source.

Bill

I don't know any spots near Beaumont, but have shot them on the flats near Cabezon.  
 

Sky Buster

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thanks for the info Bill, ill have to check out that newsletter...  
           
 

Pasco

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Was out coyote hunting last weekend about 20? minutes east of Indio.  As usual I saw plenty of quail when I was carrying a rifle.  I will be back there before the end of the year with a shotgun, which ensures no quail and lots of coyotes.  May be time to get one of those combo O/U guns.

A bit further than Beaumont but beautiful country and not a soul around.
 

Mojave

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Hunting an area on foot, without having first spotted the birds, can be very unrewarding. We usually start out our hunt by driving a Jeep slowly up a sandwash or dirt road, in an area known to hold quail, until we spot the birds, or at least very fresh tracks. It sometimes takes an hour of driving to locate birds, fresh tracks, or to hear their calling. When we locate the game, we can bail out and start the hunt without having walked too many miles first. Binos help, especially with Chukars (in which case you will do a lot of hiking, anyway). Remember when you are hunting, that according to California Code Title 14, it is illegal to camp, park or hunt within 200 yards of a waterhole. That includes springs, seeps, guzzlers, ponds, horizontal wells, etc.
 

Whoadog

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Mojave,
 If there is such a law I am sure the majority of the people on this board are guilty.

Brian
 

jackrabbit

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I doubt that law applies broadly, otherwise I could not hunt or camp anywhere in the Sierra Nevada mountain range.  Most laws of that nature are specific only to certain areas, and for certain species -- just like "baiting" restrictions for wildfowl and upland game.
 

EL CAZADOR

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Here's a little clarification of the law . . .


You can read it in "legalese" if you'd like California Code of Regulations


<font size="4">Camping/Occupying Defined: For purposes of this Section, camping/occupying is defined as establishing or inhabiting a camp; resting; picnicking; sleeping; parking or inhabiting any motor vehicle or trailer; hunting; or engaging in any other recreational activity for a period of more than thirty (30) minutes at a given location.

Wildlife Watering Places Defined: For purposes of this Section, wildlife watering places are defined as waterholes, springs, seeps and man-made watering devices for wildlife such as guzzlers (self-filling, in-the-ground water storage tanks), horizontal wells and small impoundments of less than one surface acre in size.

Prohibitions:
Camping/Occupying is prohibited within 200 yards of the following:
a) Any guzzler or horizontal well for wildlife on public land within the State of California.
b) Any of the wildlife watering places on public land within the boundary of the California Desert Conservation Area as depicted on the Bureau of Land Management maps of “Calif. Federal Public Lands Responsibility,” “Calif. Desert Conservation Area” and the new “Desert District, B.L.M.”

Camping/Occupying is prohibited within one-quarter mile of the following wildlife watering places:
a) Butte Well--T31N, R14E, Section 28, NE1/4, M.D.B.M., Lassen County.
b) Schaffer Well--T31N R14E, Section 25, Center, M.D.B.M., Lassen County.
c) Tableland Well--T31N, R14E, Section 17, SE1/4, M.D.B.M., Lassen County.
d) Table Mountain Well--T31N, R14E, Section 32, SE1/4, M.D.B.M., Lassen County.</font>
 

Fubar

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FullSack  Is this saying it is legal to hunt around a waterhole for 30 minutes, then go to the next waterhole??            Fubar
 

OC hunter

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That is they way I understand it.  
I used to think it was the 200 Yard rule, but a few people pointed out that sometimes you don't know you are near one until you walk right up to it.  Are you then guilty of hunting next to a guzzler?  During a DFG seminar, several hunters asked the same question and the DFG responded with the 30 minute/200 yard answer.  They just don't want you camping out in your easy chair next to a water source all day.
 

EL CAZADOR

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I guess you can interpret this any way you want.

If you hunt around a guzzler for 30 minutes and then leave for 5, can you return for another 30?

I think I understand the overall purpose of the law – the guzzlers were designed and installed for the benefit of game, not for the benefit of hunters.  Initially there probably weren’t laws concerning this, but some lazy hunter thought “Hey, if I just hide out near this waterhole, I can shoot anything I’d like”.

I’d like a lot less laws in the books, and let everybody resort to using common sense, but unfortunately some of those out there just don’t get it!
 

OC hunter

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I agree 100%
Last year I hunted up to a spring in the Mojave desert that was holding quite a few gallons.  There was trash everywhere, even in the water and it looked like someone had camped right next to it.  At least some guzzlers are fenced off.  This place needed to be.  I carried out as much trash as I could.
 

Mojave

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Wasn't trying to make a stir about the legaleze, but the way it has been explained to me, is that you have to look at the punctuation of the law: the 30 minute rule is after a semicolon (;). The first parts of the definition (i.e. "hunting") supposedly stand alone. I don't get into this kind of stuff so deeply - I'm a scientist. Any lawyers or DFG officers on the board?
 


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