Which bullet do you use?

bpnclark

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Hitechhunter – That is the exact reason I stopped using Barnes bullets in my rifles. Give the Sciroccos a shot.

You know Swift done something right with every bullet manufacture copying their bonded design with different versions of bonded bullets.
 



feelinducky

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Thanks for the info guys (especially Rancho), I'll have to get to work on finding the lands. But now I know how.
 

bpnclark

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I ran across this, thought some of you might like it –

Guns & Ammo Aug 2005 – Craig Boddington:

“While I like the Partition very much, I have long considered it not as ideal for deer-size game as plain old bullets and polymer-tipped bullets like the Ballistic Tip and Hornady's SST. I have also considered it not as ideal as the really tough bullets like the X, A-Frame and Fail Safe for the largest game that might be taken with an expanding bullet. But I have thought of it as a versatility champion with no equal.

This has changed with the new breed of polymer-tipped, bonded-core bullets. The first of these was the Swift Scirocco, but now there are several: Hornady InterBond, Nosler AccuBond, Winchester's AccuBond CT. This last is made by Nosler for Winchester, so it is essentially the same as the AccuBond but with a coating.

These bullets combine two concepts that seem diametrically opposed. In addition to not battering in the magazine and remaining intact throughout flight, on impact the polymer tip is driven down into the bullet, promoting rapid expansion. The bonding of the core to the jacket, on the other hand, acts to slow expansion, prevents fragmentation and greatly enhances weight retention. These things promote penetration.

When these are used in combination, you have a lot of things going for you. The plastic tip ensures fairly radical expansion, usually more than one caliber and sometimes as much as 1.5 calibers. The bonded core keeps the bullet together. So although the radical expansion must (and will) reduce penetration, this is mitigated by the momentum of the full weight of the bullet. I'm not prepared to go so far as to say these new bullets are an ideal choice for Cape buffalo, but for the full range of game from small deer up to elk, moose and bear, they may be the most versatile designs yet seen.

I've used them all, and all are actually quite similar in performance on game. Generally speaking, it appears that the Scirocco retains the most weight, but to some extent all of these bullets vary a bit in expansion and weight retention depending on impact velocity and resistance. Push 'em really fast, and they expand more radically and often lose a bit of weight; at lower velocities (or longer ranges), expansion isn't as radical, and weight retention goes up. The variables are too great to give a number, but whether AccuBond, AccuBond CT, InterBond or Scirocco, you can expect a minimum of about 80 percent weight retention on up to nearly 100 percent under ideal conditions.”
 

Hitechhunter

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I've had very disappointing performance regarding knock-down power from Ballistic Tips from my .270 on two pigs at 70 yards and two caribou at 356 and 450 yards. They were all killed, but required either follow on shots or lots of tracking.

The Trophy-Bonded Bear Claws fixed the problem and made all the difference in the world. I wonder if there is a way to quantify the knock-down performance on animals, I am still amazed at the differences between bullet designs.
 

wmidbrook

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The cost of production and therefore the cost on copper solids should come down over time after the cost of development is paid for and competition kicks into gear.

I think Sierra Boat Tail spitzers fly fantastically and knock deer down dead...But, they are too frangible for pig imo in 150 gr 30 cal. They are more frangible than Partitions which I think area great bullet as well. I've had great results with the Trophy Bonded Bear claw as well and have shot pig, deer, and elk with them.

I'm definately attracted to the newer bullets mentioned by Boddington but I haven't used my old ones up yet....and, if the partitions and TBBs can be had for half the price...well, if it ain't broken why fix it imo. I might have to use some solid copper if I do any pig hunting in CA again....I'll jump off that bridge when I get to it.

But, I do know several guys who have taken 17 hog in CA in 243 & 257 using the TSX's...not one lost hog. They swear by 'em. I don't doubt they are fantastic but they are expensive.
 

bpnclark

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Bonded bullets made today are nothing like ballistic tips (they just look like one and shoot like one). You can take any animal in North America with them. They dont explode or come apart like ballistic tips.
 

wmidbrook

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE </div>
They dont explode or come apart like ballistic tips[/b]
...depends on what you are after!

While varmintting you want something very frangible like a Hornady V-max or nosler ballistic tip. A frangible bullet is a bullet that will break up or "explode" (not really) on contact....the more frangible, the more it breaks up. So, a shot to the boiler room on deer sized game with a bullet that's frangible or breaks apart a bit is not necessarily a bad thing....shock & energy is dispersed over a much larger area and is likely not to be lost like would be the case with a bullet that passes thru and has energy that goes into the dirt.

There are some environmental concerns and greater wasted meat potential (if your shot is not placed as well) with most more frangible bullets....but, I will tell you one thing: I have never had a deer get up after it's been knocked down with the relatively frangible Sierra BTSP....Flip-side, I shot a doe out in Wyo thru the lungs with a TBB @ 50 yards...she got up and started running away...I had to place another shot into her to do the trick....So, in that case frangible would have been better IMO.

I also archery hunt--there wound channel is key. Even if the likelihood of having to track a blood trail a little bit to find your game is greater with a TSX or one of the other unleaded bullets out there, so what...it's part of the game. The solids are more likely to penetrate deeper or pass thru resulting in larger wound channels. If one is to error on having a bullet "exploded" on a shoulder or skull and not pass thru thereby wounding an animal vs. a situation where you have to track a bit to find a dead animal....I'll take the latter any day. I did have a more frangible Sierra BTSP "exploded" on a boars head once...luckily, I had a second shot op and that did the trick.
 

myfriendis410

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Amen: you couldn't pay me to shoot a ballistic tip. I love the Accubond, however.

Speck: My hunting partner and I jumped a herd of hogs and dumped four of them last March ('07) with three shots--I hit a nice hog and didn't see a 50 pounder in the mustard behind it and dropped 'em both with one TSX in my 7 mm RM at 150 yards--boy was I surprised! The bullet was lost in the brush behind the second pig!

Two weeks before that we had a 160 gr Accubond bounce OFF of a 210 lb. (gutted) boar out of the same rifle shot at about fifty yards--the pictures are on the forum here somewhere. Truly amazing. The second shot was diagonally through the body cavity and was recovered after traveling about thirty inches and weighed in at 117 grains. That's what they advertise for the Accubond--about 70% weight retention.

That same guy shoots a .300 Weatherby Magnum and uses the 200 gr. Accubond exclusively. He refuses to use a Sierra bullet anymore and hasn't found a need to try the Interbond or Scirocco's. They also shoot about 1/4" at 100 meters. Great round for hogs up to Elk.
 

bpnclark

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Accubonds, Interbonds and all the other “Bonded” bullets are all knockoffs of Swift Sciroccos (and they’re all pretty much the same).

Since they came out, it has been the only bullet I, my friends and my family use. I made the mistake of switching to Barnes Triple X before my trip to Africa. I’m sure Rancho is tired of hearing about my feelings about Sciroccos vs Barnes so I’ll end it here.

Personally, I and my family have taken deer, antelope, elk, caribou, pigs and 1 BC black bear with Sciroccos with no problems. The longer the shot, the better I feel if it’s with a Scirocco. I took my 270 with 130 gr Sciroccos on my last Javelina hunt and I was a little nervous that they were going to do too much damage. But both dropped right on the spot after hearing the big “thump”. I was really surprised that less damage was done. The bobcat had a little more damage, but what are you going to do?

BC = British Colombia (not Boone and Crocket)
 

Speckmisser

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Feelinducky, consider where you'll be hunting and for what. If you're thinking about hunting hogs in the Central Coast, military installations (FHL or Camp Roberts), or Tejon Ranch, you'd do well to look at the unleaded bullets.

Then again, some people are happy loading different bullets and re-zeroing rifles for different game or hunting locations. Nothing wrong with that. If that's something you'd be interested in doing, then the bonded bullets, either Accubond or Sciroccos definitely do the trick where lead is legal.
 

feelinducky

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This topic really went in a good direction. Thanks for all of the replies. Most of my hunting will be Nor Cal and out of state. I'm going to try the lead stuff first. If I decide to go to FHL then I'll work up some barnes loads. I really want to find the best one for my guns, so I guess I'll have to try many different styles. Now I know what to try first.
 

wmidbrook

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If you find yourself wanting to shoot jackrabbits and coyotes with your .270 or .30-06 (great way to get in tune with your rifle), the 130 gr. in 270 or 150 grain in 30-06...the SPBTs work great as do the ballistic tips for the little critters. They'll blow jackrabbits up pretty nicely....passthru wouldn't be as humane on those.
 

BrandonA

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As far as the brass discussion goes excluding the Norma/Laupa stuff I actually rank them completely opposite. While they come to you in worse condition, and they are harder to make perfect I find they Remington/Win brass lasts a lot longer per shot (primer pockets wise) compared to the Nosler Custom...

I know the discussion has raged on about Barnes vs. Leaded bullets... But the only thing you should feel more comfortable about firing the bullet at longer ranges is keeping the higher .bc to aide you against wind drift... The last hog hunt I went on we dialed a buddy of mine onto a hog @ 650 yards with a 180g TSX and it stumbled maybe 5 yards after a shoulder shot before dying.

I think the best advice would be don't settle for a cheap bullet and get one of the better bullets out there.
 

ironworker

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I use nosler accubond 130 gr in my 270 for all deer, in my 30-06, the same nosler with 180 gr accubonds.

Bullets have performed flawless so far.


Rich
 

DEERSLAM

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I'm working up a load for my 270 using the 140gr Accubond for my trip to New Zealand this July.
I gave up on Ballistic Tips for big game...very accurate but I've had bad performance with them on a number of deer.
 

Val

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I just successfully developed a load using the non-lead Nosler E-tips for my 30-06. You may as well develop a non-lead load so you're ready for a hunting opportunity in the Condor range.
 

arizona hunter

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I don't live in CA but I still use Barnes X bullets for deer & elk. They perform great and are very accurate. You just can't lose with Barnes.
 

eaglesnester

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My 30/06 BDL loves Barnes TSX 168 gr. It also loves 168gr Berger VLD. The Burger VLD was thought to be a target only bullet by Walt Burger the maker and founder of the Burger Bullet Company. Some hunters brought in a 30 minute video on the use of the Berger VLDes in hunting applications at a Shot Show and Gun trade show. The Video was shown to the Berger Rep in the booth and it clearly demonstrated that the Burger VLD is probably the deadliest and most effective big game bullet on the market. Shot after shot, animal after animal, different species and weight went down fast, many were bang flop kills. The video got Burger's attention and after their own testing to confirm that their bullets were effective in the field they started marketing their VLD long range target bullets as hunting bullets as well. You cant get any better than a match grade bullet to use for hunting. They all weigh the same, the ogive and length of the bullet is consistent from bullet to bullet. The jackets are carefully controlled to ensure exact thickness from bullet to bullet. Each one is exactly like the last one, from box to box, lot to lot. All of this adds up to, with careful reloading techniques a very accurate and effective hunting round.\
Cheers & Tighter Groups: Eaglesnester
 


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