Wind Direction Hunting Coyotes

rusman66

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I read an article in Fur Fish and Game from a very succesful preditor hunter.  He said when he calls for coyotes he always finds an area with a good clearing downwind of where he sets up. He says most of the time a coyote will circle around you to get to the downwind side. Even if the coyote doesn't know you are there, he will still approach the call from downwind.
He says its more important to have a good opening that the coyote will have to enter to get downwind of you. That is where he says he gets the majority of his shots.
It sounds logical to me, what do you all think?  how do you set up?  
 

EVAN III

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    Going against the grain, Hmmm I like it. I set up with the wind in my face when I have to deal with the wind. I like to find a spot that will keep the wind off of me. Find a good hide protected from the wind. As I found out in wister, sometimes you can't get out of the wind. I'll have to try this new tactic. Sounds good in theory. I would like to hear some other opinions.

                                   EVAN III
 

grtwythunter

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  I've had success both ways. I do my best not to go calling when it's windy, but sometimes when I've driven an hour or so, I'll give it a try. I do know that in general, wind over about 10-15 mph will start causing problems for you.
  Here's my theory: When the wind is blowing, your sound will carry farther downwind, so there is a better chance that a yote will hear it, and come in from downwind. Any yote that is upwind and hears it will probably circle downwind before it comes in. But there is always a chance you'll get the yote that is really hungry and doesn't care, and pops in from upwind, but that's how it goes. Yotes like to pop in from the spot you never expect them from.
  The yote I shot at Wister came in from downwind. I first spotted him about 150 yds out. He came on in, stopped about 60 yds out, and took a good sniff, them took off running. I was lucky enough to hit him as he crossed a small opening in the brush.
  One other thing that I either read a long time ago was written by an old time varminter. He swore by calling with the wind at his back. His thinking was when the wind was blowing really hard, it would dissapate your scent before it could get very far. I guess it would work if you could see far enough downwind(100yds or so)               Scott
 

songdog

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Coyotes can smell as good as or even better than any deer or elk I've ever hunted.  If they wind you, you're busted.  They're smart and will try and use the wind to their advantage.

Some coyotes will come busting in as quickly as the hear the call.  They make a beeline and don't worry about the wind if it's not in their favor.

Others, seemingly the older more call wise coyotes, will circle down wind and try and use their nose as well as their eyes and ears.  I think that there are a lot of these coyotes that most of us never see.  They can easily smell you from a couple hundred yards down wind and most of the time it's pretty tough to have an open enough area to see that far.

Calling with the wind at your back just doesn't really make sense.  You're now looking in the direction that you know you're going to see a spooked coyote if you see a coyote.  The other 180 degrees behind your back (upwind) is invisible to you but where a coyote could get 20 yards away before you started to hear him.

If you have two guys on a stand it often pays to take the non caller and place him downwind 100-150 yards.  If a coyote does circle down wind, that often puts him right on top of the other shooter.  If you use an electronic caller, you can do this as well except I'd stay closer than 100 yards.

When I've seen coyotes circle down wind, it's not a quarter mile out.  They'll normally come in to within 100-200 yards and then start circling around.  That should still give you quite a bit of time to drop the hammer on them before they get down wind.

For what it's worth, I don't think bobcats could give a hoot when it comes to wind/scent from my experience.  Coyotes and foxes will use it though.
 

redfox18

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Im with everyone else,I always try to play the wind and control my scent as if bowhunting deer.No smoking in the truck,,that type of thing.
 

smokin54

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I have never actually made it to a hunt yet . But I was wondering how far away are you parking the truck? Up wind or down wind
I have a few spots picked out south of niland I belive to have a funnel effect that I will try soon.
 

Hook

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There is no golden rule on which way to face, but from what I have read and watched on hunting videos, the "experts" suggest to keep the wind at  your back, looking down wind. Most of the coyotes  will try to approach from down wind, and if you are looking in that direction you have a better chance of seeing them before they make you out.  
 

Wildbio

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I have had coyotes come in from all directions: upwind, down wind and cross wind.  Usually we try to get to a point that we can no longer see the truck.  In rolling terrain we have called them in when we were about 100 yards from the truck.  But we have also had a yote bust us  that came in from the direction of the truck and start howling alerting every yote within a mile.
 

Boared

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I almost always set up in crosswinds... I put my caller out and walk about 50 yards with the wind blowing from my side... I have seen a number of coyotes come in noses in the air and never think twice about coming in for dinner. Another thing I have used with success is coyote in heat scent for call smart coyotes or for heavier wind conditions. And even a small stuffed toy animal or fur piece using a dowel rod with an eye hook in the end of it and run some fishing string through it and stick the rod in the ground next to the speaker and pull on the string to make the toy or fur "jump" up and down, this one usually brings in even the weariest of coyotes.

Boared
 

rusman66

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Hey Boared, I like the toy animal thing I will have to give that one a try. Thanks for all the info people.
 
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