Wooha - A 2000 lb. turkey

TNDEERHUNTER

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I don't think I would hunt those. Suddenly the hunter might become the hunted. Cool story.
 

metalkingdom

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I've always thought that turkeys looked like dinosaurs.  T-Rex family.  Seriously.
 

spectr17

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Here's the story from the link Bald Eagle posted above. For some reason that Discovery webpage crashed two browsers I tried to view it with.

"Turkey Dino" Found in Ancient Sea

By Larry O'Hanlon, Discovery News


These claws belonged to what was described as a one-ton turkey with claws. It's still a puzzle what the giant plant eater used the claws for.

May 10, 2002 — The fossilized remains of what could be the most puzzling dinosaur yet have been unearthed in Kane County, Utah.

"I would liken it to a one-ton turkey with claws," said paleontologist David Gillette, leader of the excavation team from the Museum of Northern Arizona.

Gillette announced the discovery this week of what's being called a Therizinosaur at a regional meeting of the Geological Society of America at Southern Utah University.

The Therizinosaur is part of the group of meat eating dinos, called therapods, that includes the ferocious T. rex. But the Therizinosaur has the broad molar-like teeth of a plant-eater, said Gillette.

Like a T. rex, it stood on two feet, but unlike a T. rex, the Therizinosaur had feathers and strong arms with fifteen-inch sickle-like claws at the ends of its equivalent of fingers.
"What they were using these claws for is a real mystery," said Gillette.

Some paleontologists have suggested the Therizinosaur was a gigantic equivalent of today's slow-moving, clawed sloths. Gillette doubts it, however, since there were too many fast-moving predators around in those days that would have made short work of any sloth-like plant eater, he said.

Gillette also said the dinosaur might be a Nothronychus ("sloth-clawed&quot, an animal with a small, beaked head and scrawny neck that sat on an upright body supported by broad legs and a short tail. But it's not yet certain, he said; the fossil could be a new species altogether.

Another very rare and odd twist is the rock in which the Therizinosaur was buried: they are sea sediments, not land rocks.

"We almost never see dinosaurs in marine deposits," said Gillette.

The best guess is that the clearly land-walking animal died near a shore or beside a river and its body was washed out to sea where it eventually sank and fossilized — making its discovery all the more amazing.

Dated at about 93 million years old, the Therizinosaur would have lived at a time when the center of North America was a shallow sea.

"It's an important discovery for late Cretaceous dinosaurs," says paleontologist Mark Goodwin of the University of California at Berkeley.

The carcass probably was bloated and floated far out to sea before it sank and was buried in ocean sediments, says Goodwin.
 

Hook

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I think Thonzberry will have somethng to say about using the name Thonzosaur...
 

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