Work Sharp, sharpening system




Goodranger

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Wow. I like the design. I have been contemplating getting a belt sharpener for awhile, but this looks pretty slick. Plus it's portable! I would like to see an edge that has been sharpened on one of these, because the belt is moving with the edge on one side of the blade, and against the edge on the other. Completely different mechanics than any other method that I have seen. This may be the answer to completely effectively eliminating the burr that is incurred with other sharpening methods. It looks like a hot item, if the websites that are selling it are any indication. Everywhere has it backordered. And 70 bucks is a very good price if it performs as well as it appears!
 

ltdann

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Seems like a good piece of gear. I wonder how long the belts last?

I use the Lansky system on my knifes and its the best....but it takes a long time ot shapen a knife.

And your right, everyplace I checked is backordered.
 

asaxon

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It works!

I bought one of these a few months ago via Amazon. I am the most incompetent knife sharpening person there is. I have tried everything from the cheap to the very expensive and my wife still did 10 times better using a simple steel - she was raised in New Zealand had her dad had a grocery with a butcher shop.

Well, the darn thing works great for me. It is pretty much idiot proof. There are 3 levels of belts that are color coded and it sharpened the fishing knives, hunting knives and kitchen knives better than I ever had and in almost no time. It is real easy to switch between the belts. I don't have any idea as yet how long the belts last but I got another set of them "in case" and the cost was negligable.
 

Mr. Luckypants

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+1 on the Lansky system. I finish sharpening with a ceramic hone then strop. Edge will hold for a LONG time.
 

palladin

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+1 on the Lansky system. I finish sharpening with a ceramic hone then strop. Edge will hold for a LONG time.
I also prefer the Lansky system. I found using a strop was the best way to finish.
It got my edges super sharp...which included cutting myself.
 

Goodranger

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Has anyone else tried the Work Sharp knife sharpener yet?
 

700x4me

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+1 on the Lansky system. I finish sharpening with a ceramic hone then strop. Edge will hold for a LONG time.
Whatever sharpening system you use has nothing to do with how long a knife will hold an edge. That is dependent on the steel used in the knife.
 

solus

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wow I just checked and it says that server was hacked crazy
 

Goodranger

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Whatever sharpening system you use has nothing to do with how long a knife will hold an edge. That is dependent on the steel used in the knife.
Actually, how you sharpen a knife does have an effect on edge longevity. The more polished the edge, the longer the edge will last.
 

700x4me

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Actually, how you sharpen a knife does have an effect on edge longevity. The more polished the edge, the longer the edge will last.
Wrong! Sorry, but I disagree with you.

From knife-making-supplies.net website:

"If a knife is not sharp enough to cut what you need to cut then it is useless. The edges have to be sharp throughout the life of the knife, but it is not so. If you see the cutting edge of a knife closely with the help of a magnifying glass or a microscope, you could see there are small teeth that make the look of a saw. This is what makes the knife sharp and useful. On using a knife repeatedly it becomes blunt. If you look at a blunt knife with a magnifying glass you could see that the saw like cutting edges are bent and not in alignment. You have to make them straight to be useful again.

The effort you take to sharpen a knife depends on the hardness of the blade that is used in the knife. If the hardness is more then it takes more effort to sharpen the cutting edges and the knife would retain the sharpness for longer time. If the hardness of the blade is less then it is easy to sharpen the knife and it will lose the sharp edge sooner. A Rockwell scale is used to measure the hardness of the metal that is used in the blade of the knife."
 
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k_rad

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Actually you are both correct, It depends on blade angle and what you are using the cutting tool for. For things like meat knives that have a very steep angle and you end up with the little strands of metal to realign. With a plane blade or wood chisel (a less steep angle) a polished blade will cut and hold an edge longer. I sharpen all of my wood cutting tools with diamond 325-800 grit and finish with Japanese water stone 2000 grit. some guys strope with leather to finish but I just don't have the time...

This is the unit I have Dann that is very simular to the system you are looking at. It is super duper fst but keeping blades square can be challenging. You are welcome to try it any time to see how you like it...http://www.amazon.com/Makita-9820-2-Horizontal-Wheel-Sharpener/dp/B0000223JC
 
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700x4me

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Actually you are both correct, It depends on blade angle and what you are using the cutting tool for. For things like meat knives that have a very steep angle and you end up with the little strands of metal to realign. With a plane blade or wood chisel (a less steep angle) a polished blade will cut and hold an edge longer. I sharpen all of my wood cutting tools with diamond 325-800 grit and finish with Japanese water stone 2000 grit. some guys strope with leather to finish but I just don't have the time...

This is the unit I have Dann that is very simular to the system you are looking at. It is super duper fst but keeping blades square can be challenging. You are welcome to try it any time to see how you like it...http://www.amazon.com/Makita-9820-2-Horizontal-Wheel-Sharpener/dp/B0000223JC
Sorry K_RAD, but you are wrong too. If polishing does the trick, then why don't they make knives & cutting tools out of Aluminum or Brass or Copper? Because they aren't hard enough. You could polish the edge on them 'til it shined, but it still wouldn't hold an edge. So, hardness is the main factor for cutting tools. Oh & by the way, I've been sharpening tools for the last 50 years or so being a Carpenter, so I do have a little knowledge about sharpening tools & knives. Sorry! That's my story & I'm stickin to it!!
 

700x4me

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Wow. I like the design. I have been contemplating getting a belt sharpener for awhile, but this looks pretty slick. Plus it's portable! I would like to see an edge that has been sharpened on one of these, because the belt is moving with the edge on one side of the blade, and against the edge on the other. Completely different mechanics than any other method that I have seen. This may be the answer to completely effectively eliminating the burr that is incurred with other sharpening methods. It looks like a hot item, if the websites that are selling it are any indication. Everywhere has it backordered. And 70 bucks is a very good price if it performs as well as it appears!
I think you cut on the down rotation by sharpening one side of the blade & then turn the knife 180 Degrees & sharpening the other side instead of using the up rotation to do (1) side. That would tear up the belt to sharpen on the up rotation.
 

slanttop357

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Yep the hardness of the steel will determine how long it will keep a edge, cre's or stainless steel will not hold up like a good steel "case hardened" I dont think polishing would be a good idea, lets say you get a good edge on your blade then you will take it to your bench grinder, with a nice hard cloth wheel spinning at lets say 3500rpm that could go to hell in a handbag reel quick. Lets not polish our knifes and save a trip to the ER. Hear is my knife sharpener a good old DAYTON. If you guys see one at a yard sale buy it, it will last a life time.
 

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Goodranger

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I think you cut on the down rotation by sharpening one side of the blade & then turn the knife 180 Degrees & sharpening the other side instead of using the up rotation to do (1) side. That would tear up the belt to sharpen on the up rotation.
Check the video again.
 

Goodranger

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Wrong! Sorry, but I disagree with you.

From knife-making-supplies.net website:

"If a knife is not sharp enough to cut what you need to cut then it is useless. The edges have to be sharp throughout the life of the knife, but it is not so. If you see the cutting edge of a knife closely with the help of a magnifying glass or a microscope, you could see there are small teeth that make the look of a saw. This is what makes the knife sharp and useful. On using a knife repeatedly it becomes blunt. If you look at a blunt knife with a magnifying glass you could see that the saw like cutting edges are bent and not in alignment. You have to make them straight to be useful again.

OK. All things being equal. two identical knives of the same steel. Sharpen the two knives on identical media at identical angle to the edge you desire. Then, take one of the knives and finish the edge on a even finer media ( the so-called teeth will be smaller an finer). The razor blade companies have been refining their processes for years to accomplish this. It is why the commercial knife sharpeners for packing plants keep refining their products for a more polished edge so that the edge will last longer. It is why the barber uses a leather strop.

The knife finished on the finer abrasive will be sharper, and the edge will last longer.
 

Goodranger

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Yep the hardness of the steel will determine how long it will keep a edge, cre's or stainless steel will not hold up like a good steel "case hardened" I dont think polishing would be a good idea, lets say you get a good edge on your blade then you will take it to your bench grinder, with a nice hard cloth wheel spinning at lets say 3500rpm that could go to hell in a handbag reel quick. Lets not polish our knifes and save a trip to the ER. Hear is my knife sharpener a good old DAYTON. If you guys see one at a yard sale buy it, it will last a life time.
By a polished edge, I was referring to a finer media, not a cloth polishing wheel. That being said, the sharpest edges I have seen were from my customer knife maker, Kenny Henschel. He is retired now, but when I took my knives to him for sharpening, he sharpened them on a belt grinder, and then took the burr off with a buffing wheel. But he was an experienced professional. For these same knives, I currently use the paper wheels on a bench grinder, but I would like to upgrade to a belt grinder. I like the looks of that Dayton!
 

Goodranger

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Just checked Cabelas and they have their own version of the sharpener which comes with extra belts. The vast majority of the reviews are positive. Looks like one guy tried to use it for some heavier work and was not happy. I think he was trying to shoot a rhino with a .410 shotgun. He probably should have been using something heavier.
 

700x4me

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Wrong! Sorry, but I disagree with you.

From knife-making-supplies.net website:

"If a knife is not sharp enough to cut what you need to cut then it is useless. The edges have to be sharp throughout the life of the knife, but it is not so. If you see the cutting edge of a knife closely with the help of a magnifying glass or a microscope, you could see there are small teeth that make the look of a saw. This is what makes the knife sharp and useful. On using a knife repeatedly it becomes blunt. If you look at a blunt knife with a magnifying glass you could see that the saw like cutting edges are bent and not in alignment. You have to make them straight to be useful again.

OK. All things being equal. two identical knives of the same steel. Sharpen the two knives on identical media at identical angle to the edge you desire. Then, take one of the knives and finish the edge on a even finer media ( the so-called teeth will be smaller an finer). The razor blade companies have been refining their processes for years to accomplish this. It is why the commercial knife sharpeners for packing plants keep refining their products for a more polished edge so that the edge will last longer. It is why the barber uses a leather strop.

The knife finished on the finer abrasive will be sharper, and the edge will last longer.[/QUOTE]

OK..........explain to me why a finer edge would last longer if it wasn't for the hardness of the steel. The finer the edge , the easier to bend or roll over or brake or chip. That is why a steel is used, to straighten out a deformed edge. Guess I will just have to agree to disagree with you. End of conversation. You wont change my opinion!
 
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